What would be the best way to upgrade from 2014 R2 to GW18?

I have a few options to upgrade GW2014 R2 to GW18 ...

1) Upgrade GW2014R2 in place on SLES11 OES2015 to GW2018 then migrate GW2018 to a new SLES2018 server ....

or

2) Build a Clean SLES 2018 server attach my 2014R2 Volume to the New server then do a Clean New install of GW18....

is one better than the other or are there any pitfalls to either process?

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  • lramm wrote:

    >
    > I have a few options to upgrade GW2014 R2 to GW18 ...
    >
    > 1) Upgrade GW2014R2 in place on SLES11 OES2015 to GW2018 then migrate
    > GW2018 to a new SLES2018 server ....
    >
    > or
    >
    > 2) Build a Clean SLES 2018 server attach my 2014R2 Volume to the New
    > server then do a Clean New install of GW18....
    >
    > is one better than the other or are there any pitfalls to either
    > process?


    Hi Lramm,

    Welcome to the Micro Focus forums!

    Those are good questions.

    Usually, one approach may offer benefits over the other. A couple of
    answers from you will help me better understand your situation.

    1) Is the GroupWise volume on the current server using NSS or native
    Linux?

    2) Is the new server going to be pure SLES or will it also be OES? By
    "SLES 2018", do you mean SLES 12, SLES 15, or OES 2018?

    3) If you mean OES 2018, do you plan to use NSS for your GroupWise
    Volume?

    --
    Kevin Boyle - Knowledge Partner
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    please show your appreciation and click on the star below this post.
    Thank you.
  • On 25.09.2018 02:44, lramm wrote:
    >
    > I have a few options to upgrade GW2014 R2 to GW18 ...
    >
    > 1) Upgrade GW2014R2 in place on SLES11 OES2015 to GW2018 then migrate
    > GW2018 to a new SLES2018 server ....
    >
    > or
    >
    > 2) Build a Clean SLES 2018 server attach my 2014R2 Volume to the New
    > server then do a Clean New install of GW18....
    >
    > is one better than the other or are there any pitfalls to either
    > process?


    Personally, I don't like to do two things at once. If something fails,
    or just doens't work like it did before, it's much more difficult to
    deal with two variables. As such, I would update to GW18 on the current
    OS first, let it run for a while and get comfortable with it, and then,
    in a totally different step. Update the OS.

    But just a note: There is no such thing as "SLES 2018". I hope you mean
    OES 2018?

    CU,
    --
    Massimo Rosen
    Micro Focus Knowledge Partner
    No emails please!
    http://www.cfc-it.de
  • First Thank you for the correction it would be SLES12 no OES2018 "too much 2018 on the brain...."
    My Groupwise volume is native Linux.

    The new server will be SLES 12 stand alone.
  • On 25.09.2018 21:24, lramm wrote:
    >
    > First Thank you for the correction it would be SLES12 no OES2018 "too
    > much 2018 on the brain...."
    > My Groupwise volume is native Linux.
    >
    > The new server will be SLES 12 stand alone.
    >
    >

    Just a comment:

    I'm always dumbfounded how people with a valid OES license can opt to
    throw all the advantages of NSS in the bin and run grouppwise on
    filesystems that simply not in the remotest ways can compete with NSS.
    Neither by performance, stability, manageability nor features. It's
    beyond me.

    CU,
    --
    Massimo Rosen
    Micro Focus Knowledge Partner
    No emails please!
    http://www.cfc-it.de
  • lramm wrote:

    >
    > First Thank you for the correction it would be SLES12 no OES2018 "too
    > much 2018 on the brain...."
    > My Groupwise volume is native Linux.
    >
    > The new server will be SLES 12 stand alone.


    Great!

    Either way you do it, there are two separate processes: Upgrade and
    Migration.

    First approach:

    > 1) Upgrade GW2014R2 in place on SLES11 OES2015 to GW2018 then migrate
    > GW2018 to a new SLES2018 server ....


    1a) Do basic health check
    1b) Install GroupWise 18 software on OES 2015
    1c) Do the upgrade
    ....
    1d) Do basic health check
    1e) Install GroupWise 18 software on the SLES 12 server
    1f) Shutdown GroupWise 18
    1g) Attach the GroupWise 18 volume to the SLES 12 server
    1h) Do the upgrade again (new IP addresses?)


    Second approach:

    > 2) Build a Clean SLES 2018 server attach my 2014R2 Volume to the New
    > server then do a Clean New install of GW18....


    1a) Do basic health check
    1e) Install GroupWise 18 software on the SLES 12 server
    1f) Shutdown GroupWise 2014
    1g) Attach the GroupWise 2014 volume to the SLES 12 server
    1h) Do the upgrade

    As you see, the second approach has quite a few fewer steps however I
    agree completely with Massimo that the first approach is the preferred
    one. If you encounter issues using the second approach, it may be more
    difficult to identify the source as you are using new GroupWise
    software and new SLES software.

    You may get some additional ideas from a new Cool Solution I authored.
    GroupWise Migrations – A Better Way
    https://www.novell.com/communities/coolsolutions/groupwise-migrations-better-way/


    --
    Kevin Boyle - Knowledge Partner
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below this post.
    Thank you.
  • Massimo Rosen wrote:

    > I'm always dumbfounded how people with a valid OES license can opt to
    > throw all the advantages of NSS in the bin and run grouppwise on
    > filesystems that simply not in the remotest ways can compete with
    > NSS. Neither by performance, stability, manageability nor features.


    Having made the comment, perhaps you could elaborate for others reading
    this thread?

    - Data on the GroupWise volume does not need to be accessed by end
    users.
    - GroupWise doesn't take advantage of trustee rights.
    - Best practices dictate that salvage be disabled

    What other NSS features make it a more appropriate choice?

    As for performance, I have not seen any comparisons. In your
    experience, what performance differences have you seen with NSS as
    compared to native Linux filesystems?

    --
    Kevin Boyle - Knowledge Partner
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below this post.
    Thank you.