autopackage

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Tool submitted by Kory Sonnier.

  • Build packages that will install on many different distros

  • Multiple front ends: best is automatically chosen so GUI users get a graphical front end, and command line users get a text based interface

  • Multiple language support (both in tools and for your own packages)

  • Automatically verifies and resolves dependencies no matter how the software was installed. This means you don't have to use autopackage for all your software, or even any of it, for packages to succesfully install


FAQ: http://www.autopackage.org/faq.html

Screenshots: http://www.autopackage.org/gallery.html

Forums: http://www.autopackage.org/community.html

ChangeLog: http://cvs.sunsite.dk/viewcvs.cgi/*checkout*/autopackage/main/ChangeLog

Source: http://www.autopackage.org/source.html

HowTo: http://www.autopackage.org/using.html

Docs: http://www.autopackage.org/docs.html

CVS: http://cvs.sunsite.dk/viewcvs.cgi/autopackage/


For users: it makes software installation on Linux easier. If a project provides an autopackage, you know it can work on your distribution. You know it'll integrate nicely with your desktop and you know it'll be up to date, because it's provided by the software developers themselves. You don't have to choose which distro you run based on how many packages are available.



For developers: it's software that lets you create binary packages for Linux that will install on any distribution, can automatically resolve dependencies and can be installed using multiple front ends, for instance from the command line or from a graphical interface. It lets you get your software to your users quicker, easier and more reliably. It immediately increases your user base by allowing people with no native package to run your software within seconds.

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