VMWare Granular Recovery : Support of non-partitioned disks on the Linux Guest virtual machine

Idea ID 1675718

VMWare Granular Recovery : Support of non-partitioned disks on the Linux Guest virtual machine

Partitions are less and less used by Linux administrators. It is indeed a blocking point when you want to dynamically enlarge a hard disk. All operations to enlarge a hard disk can be done hot under Linux. Except for the modification of the partition table, which requires a reboot or unmounting of all partitions on the disk.

This is why many Linux administrators no longer use Linux partitions.

Developers have also joined this logic, since modern filesystems such as ZFS or BTRFS no longer require a partition.

I just think that this feature requires very little development and that it would be constructive to add it.

In the meantime I do my GRE restoration by hand (a sign that this is perfectly possible) with the following procedure:

 

cd /GRE/LUN_NAME/VMNAME
losetup /dev/loop1 VMNAME_1-flat.vmdk
vgimportclone -n VMNAME /dev/loop1
lvscan
lvchange -ay /dev/VMNAME/lvroot
mkdir lvroot
mount /dev/VMNAME/lvroot lvroot
Tags (1)
2 Comments
Micro Focus Contributor
Micro Focus Contributor
Status changed to: Waiting for Votes
 
Micro Focus Expert
Micro Focus Expert
Status changed to: Declined

@Nicolas Weill 

based on the number of votes we see this request is not supported by enough interest and is not considered for integration. It is therefore declined.

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