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paulmorton Absent Member.
Absent Member.
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Enterprise Server in Azure?

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Hi there,

 

Our organisation is in the process of shifting from an on premise strategy to a Cloud strategy.  As part of this shift, we are looking to migrate our Micro Focus estate to the Azure cloud. 

 

We currently have Microfocus Enterprise Server 2.2.1(hotfix 7) installed that allows us to operate three main environments :

1) A CICS COBOL application using VSAM and DB2 data that utilises FileShare Server
2) Multiple batch COBOL programs(that use compiler dialect Enterprise COBOL for z/OS) executed by JCL that use VSAM. QSAM and DB2 data
3) Multiple batch COBOL programs(that use compiler dialect MicroFocus) again executed by JCL that use QSAM data and utilise windows command line utilities to convert data from EBCDIC to ASCII and vice versa in order to facilitate FTP, email and print activities

 

We are in very early talks with Micro Focus about this, but has anybody else attempted this?  I'm trying to figure out what Enterprise Server product will work in the Azure cloud... can we just use the version we have now?  Do we need to upgrade to Enterprise Server 3.0?  Or do we need the Enterprise Server for .Net product?

Are there any limitations with hosting our three main environments in the cloud?  Does it depend on the Enterprise Server product?  I have heard that VSAM is not supported in Azure, so a data conversion to SQL server would be required??

I've got a lot of experience with our Micro Focus estate, we started running all of the above in MFE, then SEE, now ES, however I've no real Cloud experience, so any assistance anyone can give would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thanks

 

Paul

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Micro Focus Expert
Micro Focus Expert

RE: Enterprise Server in Azure?

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It depends on how you want to use Azure.

If you're simply looking at Azure for IaaS - hosting Windows VMs - then you should be able to run Enterprise Server 2.2 there essentially unchanged. Network access, e.g. for your FTP connections, will require some Azure IaaS administration.

Enterprise Server for .NET can run in Azure in IaaS or PaaS mode. In the latter case, ES for .NET runs as a set of worker roles that can be elastically scaled and managed by Azure, and it uses SQL Server Azure for region data and scale-out. But ES for .NET is a radically different product from native ES. It is not a drop-in replacement. Both products have their advantages and disadvantages, and they have different feature sets. While you may want to look at ES for .NET, moving to it is a significant migration.

2 Replies
Micro Focus Expert
Micro Focus Expert

RE: Enterprise Server in Azure?

Jump to solution

It depends on how you want to use Azure.

If you're simply looking at Azure for IaaS - hosting Windows VMs - then you should be able to run Enterprise Server 2.2 there essentially unchanged. Network access, e.g. for your FTP connections, will require some Azure IaaS administration.

Enterprise Server for .NET can run in Azure in IaaS or PaaS mode. In the latter case, ES for .NET runs as a set of worker roles that can be elastically scaled and managed by Azure, and it uses SQL Server Azure for region data and scale-out. But ES for .NET is a radically different product from native ES. It is not a drop-in replacement. Both products have their advantages and disadvantages, and they have different feature sets. While you may want to look at ES for .NET, moving to it is a significant migration.

paulmorton Absent Member.
Absent Member.

RE: Enterprise Server in Azure?

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Thanks for the information Michael, and for responding so quickly, it's much appreciated.

The significant migration you mention going to .Net may not be worth it, if all we end up with is the same old system running in a new cloud environment, giving the user no perceived benefits. However the migration could involve modernization to the system that would potentially make it worth while.

Yes, we've a lot to think about, but your info will be a great starting point for us in future conversations we have with Micro Focus.

Thanks again

Paul
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