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Arcurion Absent Member.
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WebInspect Scheduler

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I have successfully scheduled a Web Service scan using the scheduler, but I'm not seeing a way to specify only certain times during the day to have the scan active.  I want to pause it during business hours if it does not complete the scan overnight, and then pick up where it left off the next evening.  Is this possible?  Thanks in advance.

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Micro Focus Expert
Micro Focus Expert

Re: WebInspect Scheduler

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The Scheduler tool in WebInspect (desktop) is somewhat rudimentary.   Provided you have the Windows service for WebInspect Scheduler running, it will kick off a CLI-driven WebInspect scan at your specified date and time.  This can be a one-time scan or a recurring one with periods up to monthly.  However, this scan runs headless via the CLI and it does not honor or have Blackout periods.  The user must manually intervene within the WebInspect UI > Scheduled Scans pane in order to halt the running scan.  Earlier versions of WebInspect lacked this Stop feature and users had to instead kill the WI.EXE process to interrupt the scan.  Once interrupted, the Scheduled Scan may not be Resumed from a Scheduled Scan perspective, but the user may open the scan inside the WebInspect UI and Resume it there per other normal scan processes.

 

Going a little further, it may be possible to script a kill program of some sort to shut down the WI.EXE process at your desired time.  This would permit you to "manually" halt the Scheduled scan, but not to Resume it.  The same trickery might be employed using the WebInspect API service, since it is essentially a listener port coupled with the WebInspect CLI WI.EXE.

 

Completely separate from the Scheduler, you could generate your own script to call the WebInspect CLI directly.  See the WebInspect Help guide for full details and options.  Using a saved scan template seems to work the best for CLI execution.

 

 

By contrast, the enterprise solution, HP WebInspect Enterprise (WIE), offers a very robust scheduling system which includes Blackout periods (or White-in periods), as well as Scan Priorities, and automated Start/Resume of scans based on those rules.  WebInspect enterprise is a scalable system incorporating one or more WebInspect scanner engines reporting to a central server that provides a web-based UI as a multi-user environment with centralized (database) storage of the scans and reports.  There is no rip-and-replace required when migrating from WebInspect desktop to WIE, you merely link the WebInspect desktop as a client.  From that perspective you can upload all of your historical scans and saved scan setting templates to the WIE Manager server, as well as download other persons' scans for review in the local WebInspect desktop UI.


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Micro Focus Expert
Micro Focus Expert

Re: WebInspect Scheduler

Jump to solution

The Scheduler tool in WebInspect (desktop) is somewhat rudimentary.   Provided you have the Windows service for WebInspect Scheduler running, it will kick off a CLI-driven WebInspect scan at your specified date and time.  This can be a one-time scan or a recurring one with periods up to monthly.  However, this scan runs headless via the CLI and it does not honor or have Blackout periods.  The user must manually intervene within the WebInspect UI > Scheduled Scans pane in order to halt the running scan.  Earlier versions of WebInspect lacked this Stop feature and users had to instead kill the WI.EXE process to interrupt the scan.  Once interrupted, the Scheduled Scan may not be Resumed from a Scheduled Scan perspective, but the user may open the scan inside the WebInspect UI and Resume it there per other normal scan processes.

 

Going a little further, it may be possible to script a kill program of some sort to shut down the WI.EXE process at your desired time.  This would permit you to "manually" halt the Scheduled scan, but not to Resume it.  The same trickery might be employed using the WebInspect API service, since it is essentially a listener port coupled with the WebInspect CLI WI.EXE.

 

Completely separate from the Scheduler, you could generate your own script to call the WebInspect CLI directly.  See the WebInspect Help guide for full details and options.  Using a saved scan template seems to work the best for CLI execution.

 

 

By contrast, the enterprise solution, HP WebInspect Enterprise (WIE), offers a very robust scheduling system which includes Blackout periods (or White-in periods), as well as Scan Priorities, and automated Start/Resume of scans based on those rules.  WebInspect enterprise is a scalable system incorporating one or more WebInspect scanner engines reporting to a central server that provides a web-based UI as a multi-user environment with centralized (database) storage of the scans and reports.  There is no rip-and-replace required when migrating from WebInspect desktop to WIE, you merely link the WebInspect desktop as a client.  From that perspective you can upload all of your historical scans and saved scan setting templates to the WIE Manager server, as well as download other persons' scans for review in the local WebInspect desktop UI.


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