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AD Driver: How can I obtain the name of the connected DC?

Hi IDM experts,

we run an AD driver which triggers different customized Exchange Cmdlets, using the "PSExecute" pseudoattribute.
In order to avoid replication-related errors, the exchange server should always communicate with the domain controller which is running the remote loader.
If I understand correctly, the Cmdlet parameter "-DomainController" is provided exactly for this purpose.
For example, if one uses the default creation method by setting the homeMDB and mailNickname attributes,
the engine automatically generates a Cmdlet that includes this parameter together with the FQDN of the executing domain controller.

Is there a simple way (without defining an additional GCV) to get the name of the connected DC, so one can provide it to the PSExecute statements?

Best regards,
Michael
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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

mgolor;2485402 wrote:
Hi IDM experts,

we run an AD driver which triggers different customized Exchange Cmdlets, using the "PSExecute" pseudoattribute.
In order to avoid replication-related errors, the exchange server should always communicate with the domain controller which is running the remote loader.
If I understand correctly, the Cmdlet parameter "-DomainController" is provided exactly for this purpose.
For example, if one uses the default creation method by setting the homeMDB and mailNickname attributes,
the engine automatically generates a Cmdlet that includes this parameter together with the FQDN of the executing domain controller.

Is there a simple way (without defining an additional GCV) to get the name of the connected DC, so one can provide it to the PSExecute statements?

Best regards,
Michael


Hi Michael,
Really defining additional GCV, can be the easiest way, but even without extra GCV, you still have a number of options:
1. you can read DirXML-ShimAuthServer attribute from your AD driver
2. You can parse <server> info from AutenticationInfo document (available when driver start). You can do it in any place, but better parse it in Startup policy.
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Cadet 2nd Class Cadet 2nd Class
Cadet 2nd Class

Hi Al,

thanks for your reply!
Unfortunately in our case the shimAuthServer attribute holds the IP address and not the required FQDN, since DNS resolution does not work here.
I also searched for the hostname in the trace output of the driver startup process, but the remote loader does not seem to send this information.
I guess I'll just have to define an extra GCV then.

Best regards,
Michael
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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

mgolor;2485707 wrote:
the shimAuthServer attribute holds the IP address and not the required FQDN, since DNS resolution does not work here.

You can add the FQDN to C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts on the RL...
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