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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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German, capitalization question

Just something I was wondering about when testing some rules with non-ASCII characters.

When you use the DirXML token-upper-case token on German text which includes the Eszett “ß” character, does it convert this to “SS” in uppercase? Shouldn’t this occur or am I misunderstanding the capitalization rules for German?
It doesn’t work for me when I test it, and I wondered if it was my system locale that had some impact here.

Also, does anyone know of any other Latin letters which change their "width" when their case is changed like this one can?


This is one for Lothar I guess, but anyone else who might be able to answer this - feel free.

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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Re: German, capitalization question


hi,

whatever dirxml does, from a language viewpoint this is disputed and no
coherent standard is in place. old-style is 'SZ' as an uppercase
representation of 'ß', the more modern form is to replace it with 'SS'.
but: even official institutions (i only can deduce from personal
experience in Austria, which might be a special case in itself, as is
Switzerland, in relation to Germany), seem to have not really gotten
into one an one only way to handle this specially difficult character
some tried to get rid of with the last reform of the german (written)
language a couple of years ago.

this is a disputed and open for all, anything goes thing atm i´d say.
linguist´s wild west 🙂


florian


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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: German, capitalization question

florianz wrote:

> whatever dirxml does, from a language viewpoint this is disputed and no
> coherent standard is in place. old-style is 'SZ' as an uppercase
> representation of 'ß', the more modern form is to replace it with 'SS'.


That was my understanding.

I was just interested, due to ensuring that rules like (this is a stretch, but just an example):

construct a username with the first three characters from your last name, plus the last 5 characters from your first name (all in uppercase).

How does this work when you have a character which becomes two characters in uppercase?


> but: even official institutions (i only can deduce from personal
> experience in Austria, which might be a special case in itself, as is
> Switzerland, in relation to Germany), seem to have not really gotten
> into one an one only way to handle this specially difficult character
> some tried to get rid of with the last reform of the german (written)
> language a couple of years ago.
>
> this is a disputed and open for all, anything goes thing atm i´d say.
> linguist´s wild west 🙂


I was mostly asking because some googling seems to indicate that Java is one of the few places that does convert ß to SS.
My question is why DirXML which runs in Java would behave differently, and I wonder if it is just a locale specific thing.

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