Highlighted
Super Contributor.
Super Contributor.
111 views

IDM_PowerShell_Service script with long execution time

Jump to solution

Hi!

I wonder if there are any known issues that may occur when calling a powershell script using the IDM_PowerShell_Service via AD-driver if the script takes a while to execute?

E.g.

  • Is IDM_PowerShell_Service single threaded and all jobs are executed in a sequence?
  • Are there any timeouts that may trigger?

We plan to delete home directories using a powershell script, and need to take ownership of files, which might take a while (measured about 50 seconds for 10000 files). Also setting the ACL takes a while, and if two or three such jobs are queued, what may the conseqences be?

Thanks for your input!
/Thomas

Labels (1)
1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Outstanding Contributor.
Outstanding Contributor.

Hi.

I think the general answer is to use the scripting driver instead of AD PSExecute. When you have a long running job from a PSExecute command on an AD driver, your subscriber channel will be waiting until the Powershell command completes or errors out.

But I have done similar things as you describe, and in that case I have either used created "job" files using Powershell or attribute flags on the user in AD and then I have had a separate Powershell script that either interates generated files or searches for users with certain attributes and then execute what is needed.

So for example, generate a file using Powershell containing a predefined format, for instance Action and sAMAccountName as in "DeleteHomeFolder, MyUserName". And then a scheduled Powershell script that iterates these files and performs the deletion of home folders as a separate process from IDM.

Best regards

Marcus

View solution in original post

2 Replies
Highlighted
Outstanding Contributor.
Outstanding Contributor.

Hi.

I think the general answer is to use the scripting driver instead of AD PSExecute. When you have a long running job from a PSExecute command on an AD driver, your subscriber channel will be waiting until the Powershell command completes or errors out.

But I have done similar things as you describe, and in that case I have either used created "job" files using Powershell or attribute flags on the user in AD and then I have had a separate Powershell script that either interates generated files or searches for users with certain attributes and then execute what is needed.

So for example, generate a file using Powershell containing a predefined format, for instance Action and sAMAccountName as in "DeleteHomeFolder, MyUserName". And then a scheduled Powershell script that iterates these files and performs the deletion of home folders as a separate process from IDM.

Best regards

Marcus

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner
I second the vote for scripting driver. Have used both over the years. The powershell Service is far more limited.
Alex McHugh - Knowledge Partner - Stavanger, Norway
Who are the Knowledge Partners
If you appreciate my comments, please click the Like button.
If I have resolved your issue, please click the Accept as Solution button.
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of Micro Focus. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation. Certain versions of content ("Material") accessible here may contain branding from Hewlett-Packard Company (now HP Inc.) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company. As of September 1, 2017, the Material is now offered by Micro Focus, a separately owned and operated company. Any reference to the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks is historical in nature, and the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks are the property of their respective owners.