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How to setup Web Load Test using Think time and Pacing

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Hi All, As I need to setup Load Test for below Web scenario, would greatly appreciate if someone could advise me for below questions.  Thanks a lot.  Leanne.


Requirement:

- 1200 users visit the Web per hour, average user visit time is 5min, Total 100 concurrent users (20user/min x 5min visiting time).
- 80% user trigger Business Process 1 Block: Login action, Browse Product action, Logout action.

- 20% user trigger Business Process 2 Block: Login action, Browse Product action, Submit Order action, Logout action.

- Each action triggers 1 HTTP request with target server response time 6 secs, and think time of 10 secs


Question 1)

Refer to above requirements, Business Process 1 requires 48 secs (i.e. 3 actions x 16 seconds), and Process 2 requires 64 secs (i.e 4 actions x 16 secs), so how can control the remaining times for Business Process 1 and 2 to simulate 5 min user visiting time (300 secs) ?  Is that I need to use Pacing time, so that load runner will trigger next vuser when reach fixed internal seconds, or I need to configure different total think time for above business process 1 and 2 ?


Question 2) If it is to use Pacing, am I right that I should use the Start New iteration at Fixed interval option and configure 300secs in this case, which is the user visit time 5min ? 


Question 3) Could you share on when the iteration at random interval will be used and how to calculate the random interval range ?

 

 

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Re: How to setup Web Load Test using Think time and Pacing

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Hi @LeannAnn,

 

You use ThinkTime during the execution of a scenario, within an iteration.

You use pacing between iterations.

 

The use of ThinkTime and pacing depends on how the application is used by your customer.

 

You put ThinkTime usualy  on these spots where the end-user or real physical user is taking time to fill-out a web form and/or looking in documentation to fill-out that form.

For instance: it takes time to provide username and password through the keyboard and click with the mouse on the login button.

The total time this takes, the webserver is waiting and doing nothing for this user.

This you may call ThinkTime.

It is possible to record the ThinkTime or insert fixed ThinkTime.

You can control this from VuGen: Menu -> Record -> Recording options or press Ctrl + F7

Under General -> Script there are two options regarding ThinkTime:

- Generate fixed think time after end transaction, default 3 sec, you can customize this

- Generate think time greater then threshold, default 3 sec, you can customize this

 

Answers to your questions:

Q1: Using pacing is ok.

Best way to look at think time is to look how is the application used by your customer.

If the user needs 10 sec after each action than the think time of 10 sec is ok.

 

Q2: correct

 

Q3: if you do not use random then every time you run the test, the test is executed more like the previous one.

When you use random then the result may vary from run to run.

Random probably simulates more the real use of the application.

 

 

NB: If this solves your problem / helps you on the way, consider acknowledging with Kudos. To kudo a post, select the thumbs up icon in the gray square by the post in the thread.

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Honored Contributor.
Honored Contributor.

Re: How to setup Web Load Test using Think time and Pacing

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Hi @LeannAnn,

 

You use ThinkTime during the execution of a scenario, within an iteration.

You use pacing between iterations.

 

The use of ThinkTime and pacing depends on how the application is used by your customer.

 

You put ThinkTime usualy  on these spots where the end-user or real physical user is taking time to fill-out a web form and/or looking in documentation to fill-out that form.

For instance: it takes time to provide username and password through the keyboard and click with the mouse on the login button.

The total time this takes, the webserver is waiting and doing nothing for this user.

This you may call ThinkTime.

It is possible to record the ThinkTime or insert fixed ThinkTime.

You can control this from VuGen: Menu -> Record -> Recording options or press Ctrl + F7

Under General -> Script there are two options regarding ThinkTime:

- Generate fixed think time after end transaction, default 3 sec, you can customize this

- Generate think time greater then threshold, default 3 sec, you can customize this

 

Answers to your questions:

Q1: Using pacing is ok.

Best way to look at think time is to look how is the application used by your customer.

If the user needs 10 sec after each action than the think time of 10 sec is ok.

 

Q2: correct

 

Q3: if you do not use random then every time you run the test, the test is executed more like the previous one.

When you use random then the result may vary from run to run.

Random probably simulates more the real use of the application.

 

 

NB: If this solves your problem / helps you on the way, consider acknowledging with Kudos. To kudo a post, select the thumbs up icon in the gray square by the post in the thread.

View solution in original post

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Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: How to setup Web Load Test using Think time and Pacing

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Hi @asr_Dennis,
Thanks so much for your advice. 🙂
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