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"Hits Per Second" graph Versus "Throughput" graph

What is the different between the "Hits Per Second" graph Versus "Throughput" graph generated by the LoadRunner analysis tool.Does the "Hits per second" graph represents the number of HTTP requests received by the VU?, while the "Throughput" graph represents the number of bytes made by these HTTP requests ?
thanks in advance for the help.
Sami

 

P.S. This thread has been moved from Performance Center Support and News Forum to  LoadRunner Support Forum. -HP Forum Moderator

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If you look on the bottom left corner of the LR Analysis tool when you select each type of graph there is a good description of each.

Hit per second displays the number of hits made on the Web server by Vusers during each second of the load test.

Throughput displays the amount of data in bytes the the Vusers receive from the server at any given second.

You can also consult the LR Analysis User's Guide.

Alan
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This answer really just says that the hits per second graph displays the number of hits per second, which is doubtless true but doesn't really add much information. The question is what exactly is a "hit".

I presume that here any request is meant which would include many configuration-dependant requests. A single code line in a script may for example download a web page which contains hundeds of embedded resources like .jpg or .css files. Each of these could potentially generate a "hit", but may also not depending on whether or not the run is configured to download embedded resources and also depending on the cache settings and whether or not the referenced content is already available in the cache. Is that about right?

What I'm not clear about is what "hits" are in the context of other protocols like sockets, SAPGUI etc.

 

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I was wondering about this exact question. Have you found an answer to it in the mean time? My experience is that with the same number of transactions per second the hits per second may vary. I just cannot prove yet.
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Hello John,

 

from the HP LoadRunner Analysis User Guide (in attached) i found these definitions:

 

 

Hits per Second - Pag: 252 -  Chapter 14 • Web Resources Graphs

 

This Graph shows the number of HTTP requests made by Vusers to the Web server during each second of the load test scenario run.

 

 

 

Throughput Graph - Pag: 261 -  Chapter 14 • Web Resources Graphs

 

This graph shows the amount of throughput on the server during each second of the load test scenario run. Throughput is measured in bytes or megabytes and represents the amount of data that the Vusers received from

the server at any given second.

 

 

Bye bye

 

Gianfranco

 

 

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Hi Guys

 

I am testing a web application which contains six pages.After the test in the summary the total hits are shown as 39000 and hits per second is 9.6.

 

What does this 39000 mean?

Whether my application pages are getting downloaded 39000 times.

 

Can anyobsy help me?

 

Thanks

Harsha

 

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Hi,

It was clearly mentioned that "hit" means HTTP request reach to server.

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