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bertschj Absent Member.
Absent Member.
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How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

We have a MLA agreement for OES and have purchased the appropriate licenses for it.

But what about SUSE? We want to run OES on Linux soon, but do we need a sub for SUSE also? We plan on authenticating to eDir, etc. and not directly to Linux.
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7 Replies
Brunold Rainer
New Member.

Re: How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

bertschj,

we are also a MLA customer and I know there was a calculation on how many sles server licenses you can use for free for the number of users. That quote might have changed and I'm currently not aware of the new one. Therefor I would either fill the form on the link below to request a sales call:

Contacts & Offices

or contact the local Novell office or a Novell partner.

Rainer

PS: we bought the remaining sles licenses we needed from Microsoft, much cheaper then from Novell directly ...
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gldavis1 Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

The SLES entitlement just got better as of 9/11/09.

From Novell Marketing -

The "SLES Entitlement" has officially been changed for all customers who own Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 or Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1. The news has been posted on the product page at novell.com and can be found here http://www.novell.com/products/openenterpriseserver/eula_change.html.

Now, customers are entitled to deploy SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for any workload as long as it's access is limited to licensed OES users. This extends beyond anti-virus and back-up software to business applications and databases, even web apps. As long as those accessing the new applications are covered under OES licenses, the customer is compliant. Under this entitlement, customers are also limited to using x86-64 hardware.

Prior, OES customers could only deploy SLES to run the workgroup services that shipped with OES, like NSS, iPrint, DNS/DHCP, eDirectory, etc. This was a restrictive policy that didn't serve customers.



>>> On 9/9/2009 at 2:16 PM, brunold<brunold@no-mx.forums.novell.com> wrote:



bertschj,

we are also a MLA customer and I know there was a calculation on how
many sles server licenses you can use for free for the number of users.
That quote might have changed and I'm currently not aware of the new
one. Therefor I would either fill the form on the link below to request
a sales call:

'Contacts & Offices' (http://www.novell.com/company/contacts-offices)

or contact the local Novell office or a Novell partner.

Rainer

PS: we bought the remaining sles licenses we needed from Microsoft,
much cheaper then from Novell directly ...


--
brunold
------------------------------------------------------------------------
brunold's Profile: http://forums.novell.com/member.php?userid=562
View this thread: http://forums.novell.com/showthread.php?t=385780
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Brunold Rainer
New Member.

Re: How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

gldavis,

that are very good news ! Many thanks for that information and the link !

Rainer
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bertschj Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

yes - thanks for that. just got some new ideas... : )

gldavis;1857329 wrote:
The SLES entitlement just got better as of 9/11/09.

From Novell Marketing -

The "SLES Entitlement" has officially been changed for all customers who own Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 or Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1. The news has been posted on the product page at novell.com and can be found here Thousands of More Reasons to Love Open Enterprise Server.

Now, customers are entitled to deploy SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for any workload as long as it's access is limited to licensed OES users. This extends beyond anti-virus and back-up software to business applications and databases, even web apps. As long as those accessing the new applications are covered under OES licenses, the customer is compliant. Under this entitlement, customers are also limited to using x86-64 hardware.

Prior, OES customers could only deploy SLES to run the workgroup services that shipped with OES, like NSS, iPrint, DNS/DHCP, eDirectory, etc. This was a restrictive policy that didn't serve customers.



>>> On 9/9/2009 at 2:16 PM, brunold<brunold@no-mx.forums.novell.com> wrote:



bertschj,

we are also a MLA customer and I know there was a calculation on how
many sles server licenses you can use for free for the number of users.
That quote might have changed and I'm currently not aware of the new
one. Therefor I would either fill the form on the link below to request
a sales call:

'Contacts & Offices' (Contacts & Offices)

or contact the local Novell office or a Novell partner.

Rainer

PS: we bought the remaining sles licenses we needed from Microsoft,
much cheaper then from Novell directly ...


--
brunold
------------------------------------------------------------------------
brunold's Profile: NOVELL FORUMS - View Profile: brunold
View this thread: How is OES / SUSE Licensed? - NOVELL FORUMS
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jmarton2 Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 19:50:26 +0000, Glen Davis wrote:

> Now, customers are entitled to deploy SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for
> any workload as long as it's access is limited to licensed OES users.
> This extends beyond anti-virus and back-up software to business
> applications and databases, even web apps. As long as those accessing
> the new applications are covered under OES licenses, the customer is
> compliant. Under this entitlement, customers are also limited to using
> x86-64 hardware.


This is very good news. Right now I'm trying to get clarification on
some additional questions the new EULA brings up.

- Can customers only use this entitlement to run SLES10 and not SLES11?
- In a virtual environment, does the SLES entitlement cover the entire
physical host like a typical SLES subscription or does it only cover
individual virtual machines? If it's the entire physical host that opens
up a gray area when a single host has multiple SLES instances, some
accessed only by internal users covered by OES licenses and others
accessed by additional users (e.g. web servers).

As soon as I hear anything back I'll update this thread.

--
Joe Marton
Novell Knowledge Partner
SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 is ready for action.

Joe Marton Emeritus Knowledge Partner
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grimlock1 Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

Joseph Marton wrote:
>
> As soon as I hear anything back I'll update this thread.
>


Ask if that includes getting updates/service packs and such?
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jmarton2 Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: How is OES / SUSE Licensed?

On Mon, 21 Sep 2009 16:43:40 +0000, Patrick Farrell wrote:

> Ask if that includes getting updates/service packs and such?


Service packs are always free for everyone.

I would imagine the whole point of this entitlement, though, is to get
patches. After all, anyone can use SLES for free if they don't want or
care to download patches. The purpose of the various SLES entitlements
offered by other Novell products is to give a subscription in order to
obtain patches. So it would appear that while anyone could have taken
their SLES codes from OES and illegally use them for non-workgroup SLES
servers in order to obtain patches, now the practice is completely kosher
as long as the users accessing these instances are covered by OES
licenses.



--
Joe Marton
Novell Knowledge Partner
SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 is ready for action.

Joe Marton Emeritus Knowledge Partner
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