Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.
1942 views

NFS Trace

My server (NW-OES-SP2) is crashing after several days and I think that NFAU
could be the reason. But I'm not sure. So I started NFS trace and I get
messages like

100003.3.03 <LOOKUP> [TCP xxx] RStatus 0 Accept 0 NFS 0
100003.3.01 <GET ATTR> [TCP xxx] RStatus 0 Accept 0 NFS 0
100003.3.01 <GET ATTR> [TCP xxx] RStatus 0 Accept 0 NFS 0
100003.3.04 <ACCESS> [TCP xxx] RStatus 0 Accept 0 NFS 0
100003.3.06 <READ> [TCP xxx] RStatus 0 Accept 0 NFS 0
100003.3.01 <GET ATTR> [xxx] RStatus 0 Accept 0 NFS 0
100003.3.01 <GET ATTR> [TCP xxx] RStatus 0 Accept 0 NFS 0

I cannot interpret these messages. Does any description of the trace screen
information exist ?


Cheers, k.
Labels (1)
0 Likes
4 Replies
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: NFS Trace

In article <43D5E368.32C4.0021.0@*remove-me*web.de>, K-i-r wrote:
> Does any description of the trace screen
> information exist ?
>

I'll ask...

bd
NSC Volunteer SysOp

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: NFS Trace

Here's what I got back from Novell...

"The NFS trace screen is a log of the types of NFS requests being made
by clients. It might not turn out to be helpful in troubleshooting
crashes, unless you could show that a certain unusual type or sequence
of requests was always coming in before each crash.

If this info is not documented in the NFAU doc, then I don't think it
will be in any of our docs. This output is representative of things
that are standard in the NFS protocol, so for those familiar with how
the NFS protocol communicates, the are "common knowledge" rather than
proprietary information. The first number (6 digits) is the SunRPC
service number. 100003 is NFS. Those are defined by Sun in various
RFCs). The second number (1 digit) is the protocol version of the
service. So this is NFS protocol v3. The 3rd number (2 digits) is the
procedure number, followed by the procedure name (defined by Sun in NFS
RFCs.)

TCP means this is NFS over TCP (rather than UDP). Rstatus is the
status given by the response to the procedure. 0 means the procedure
completed without error. I'm not sure the last 2 items: Accept 0, NFS
0. But in general, 0 is good. Even if some of the requests received
errors (non zero response) that wouldn't automatically suggest that the
system is in danger of crashing. Errors are very common, like when you
look for a file that is not there."

Hope it helps!

bd
NSC Volunteer SysOp

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Antw: Re: NFS Trace

Thanks for your dedication.

k.
0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Antw: NFS Trace

No problem.

bd
NSC Volunteer SysOp

0 Likes
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of Micro Focus. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation. Certain versions of content ("Material") accessible here may contain branding from Hewlett-Packard Company (now HP Inc.) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company. As of September 1, 2017, the Material is now offered by Micro Focus, a separately owned and operated company. Any reference to the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks is historical in nature, and the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks are the property of their respective owners.