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NSS question

I have been trying to create an nss pool from some free space on a disk....i
keep getting an nss abort error. I can create an nss pool on an extra disk i
have. Seems i read some threads on issues when doing this same thing.


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Re: NSS question

On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 13:25:10 +0000, Frank Osborne wrote:

> I have been trying to create an nss pool from some free space on a
> disk....i keep getting an nss abort error. I can create an nss pool on an
> extra disk i have. Seems i read some threads on issues when doing this
> same thing.


Well known issue. NSS cannot co-exist with standard linux partitions
without some evms hacking. Best idea is not to even try 🙂

--
Mark Robinson
Novell Volunteer SysOp

One by one the penguins steal my sanity...

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Re: NSS question

> On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 13:25:10 +0000, Frank Osborne wrote:
>
> > I have been trying to create an nss pool from some free space on a
> > disk....i keep getting an nss abort error. I can create an nss pool on an
> > extra disk i have. Seems i read some threads on issues when doing this
> > same thing.

>
> Well known issue. NSS cannot co-exist with standard linux partitions
> without some evms hacking. Best idea is not to even try 🙂
>
> --
> Mark Robinson
> Novell Volunteer SysOp
>
> One by one the penguins steal my sanity...
>


So even though I have been religiously following the instructions how to
have LVM and EVMS co-exist on the same single logical disk, are you saying
it just really doesn't work. I'm still relatively new on the Linux side,
so I'm all for the learning experience, but this seems way more difficult
than it should be.

Just so I can move on with my life I usually give up and create a second
partition (virtually) or add another physical disk, and make that EVM/NSS
from the start. No issues there.

That begs another question -- is this all moot? Would best-practice be to
have boot swap and root on a separate partition anyway?

Thanks in advance.


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Re: NSS question

On Mon, 20 Nov 2006 20:08:49 +0000, toddsherwin wrote:



> So even though I have been religiously following the instructions how to
> have LVM and EVMS co-exist on the same single logical disk, are you saying
> it just really doesn't work. I'm still relatively new on the Linux side,
> so I'm all for the learning experience, but this seems way more difficult
> than it should be.


Linux wasn't this hard until we got this Red N stuff on it 😮

AFAIK, even with the boot hacks, you cannot mix evms and lvm on the same
disk! Nor would I want to... I use LVM for standard Linux stuff, EVMS
for clustering, and let NSS do its thing on its own disks.


> Just so I can move on with my life I usually give up and create a second
> partition (virtually) or add another physical disk, and make that
> EVM/NSS from the start. No issues there.


Ahh, you have seen the light 🙂

> That begs another question -- is this all moot? Would best-practice be
> to have boot swap and root on a separate partition anyway?


Well, now. There's a question. I personally always have 2 disks
(actually volumes from a real hardware raid controller!). The first one
is for the linux system, the second for NSS. I partition the first one
with a root fs, a swap partition, and then hand the rest of the space over
to LVM and start chopping it up from there...

--
Mark Robinson
Novell Volunteer SysOp

One by one the penguins steal my sanity...

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