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jgooderh Absent Member.
Absent Member.
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Slowly migrating to OES/Linux and DNS issues

Hi All;

We are in the process of migrating our file and print servers from Netware (SP8) to OES2/Linux (SP3) along with all of the services like DNS, DHCP, iPrint, etc... After starting to install the Linux servers in the tree, it seems that our ability to manage DNS has gone away. When I go into the DNS DHCP manager (I loaded the latest from the CD), all I get are root zone server info. We did have a couple of different zones defined and they are completely gone. I've spent some time looking into it and I wanted to get some feedback as to the differences/future of DNS within eDir.

I was under the impression that there was to be only one DNS-DHCP locator object in the tree. We have a specific one high up in the directory structure and if I look at the attributes within C1, I can see that it has the right zones, DNS servers, DHCP scopes, etc..

First, it has DNS server objects listed that are no longer there. Does the install of OES/Linux delete DNS server objects? It does create some, like that DNSDHCP-GROUP object. I just want to make sure. It does change eDir, I'm not sure how much.

Second, there are now DNS-DHCP objects in every container that I've installed a new server into. Have I botched the install of these servers somehow? There's a lot of info on migrating DNS services from Netware to OES/Linux online, but how about coexistance?

I've also seen some forum postings on running DNIPINST and starting over, but that it could cause major problems.

Strange thing is that DNS still loads on the Netware server. Named will load without errors and nslookup will resolve names. So we are not completely dead in the water, more like stasis. I cannot add new entries to DNS and before I start breaking a lot of eggs, I thought I would make sure I am on the right page.
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3 Replies
Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: Slowly migrating to OES/Linux and DNS issues

Hi.

On 12.04.2011 18:36, jgooderh wrote:
>
> Hi All;
>
> We are in the process of migrating our file and print servers from
> Netware (SP8) to OES2/Linux (SP3) along with all of the services like
> DNS, DHCP, iPrint, etc... After starting to install the Linux servers in
> the tree, it seems that our ability to manage DNS has gone away. When I
> go into the DNS DHCP manager (I loaded the latest from the CD), all I
> get are root zone server info.


You allowed the OES install to create a new DNS/DHCP locator object
during the configuration of DNS, instead of pointing it at the existing
one. Now you have multiple locator objects, and only see the services
linked to whichever locator object the management tool sees first.
You're only supposed to have one.


> I was under the impression that there was to be only one DNS-DHCP
> locator object in the tree. We have a specific one high up in the
> directory structure and if I look at the attributes within C1, I can see
> that it has the right zones, DNS servers, DHCP scopes, etc..
>
> First, it has DNS server objects listed that are no longer there. Does
> the install of OES/Linux delete DNS server objects?


No.

> It does create some,
> like that DNSDHCP-GROUP object. I just want to make sure. It does change
> eDir, I'm not sure how much.


It does exactly what you tell it to in the DNS configuration. If you
leave those at default, it'll create all new objects in the server
container. It doesn't touch any other objects.

> Second, there are now DNS-DHCP objects in every container that I've
> installed a new server into. Have I botched the install of these servers
> somehow?


Yep. Don't sweat it though, this isn't exactly well designed and obvious.

> Strange thing is that DNS still loads on the Netware server.


Not at all. It doesn't really need the locator object for the services
it's supposed to serve, as it can follow through from it's own server
object (which is unambigous). From there it knows the DNS server object,
and finally finds the locator object which contains it. It never has to
"guess" which locator object is the right one.

> Named will
> load without errors and nslookup will resolve names. So we are not
> completely dead in the water, more like stasis. I cannot add new entries
> to DNS and before I start breaking a lot of eggs, I thought I would make
> sure I am on the right page.


The fix is relatively easy. Find the false locator objects (the ones in
the OES server contexts most likely), and nuke them. Then go into OES
Installation and Configuration in Yast, and reconfigure DNS, this time
make sure to specify the existing locator object, instead of letting it
create a new one.

CU,
--
Massimo Rosen
Novell Product Support Forum Sysop
No emails please!
http://www.cfc-it.de
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joharmon Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Slowly migrating to OES/Linux and DNS issues

Back up your dns/dhcp first before touching any locators... just in case.
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jgooderh Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Slowly migrating to OES/Linux and DNS issues

Thanks for the quick reply Massimo. I had deleted some of the DNS-DHCP locators per your thoughts and I am able to see the zones from the management console again.

Hi joharmon, yes, I had copied the DNS folder from the root of the SYS vol that had the DB inside so I felt I had some backup (dunno if that's best practice). I had some confidence in that when looking at the 'right' locator in C1, there was a ton of info.

At any rate, thanks all. On with the migration!
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