Absent Member.. AlexGg Absent Member..
Absent Member..
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Central OS: Win or *nix?

If to install OOCentral either OS platform (Win/Linux) could be chosen, what is better recommendation might be?

Is that related what target servers OSes are? Any Pro's/Con's? Thanx!

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Absent Member.. ntt00015 Absent Member..
Absent Member..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

Hi,

 

My choice would be a Unix based system because of performance and security reasons. I cannot remember but I guess I've read a  reccomendation in OO documents about this. 

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Absent Member.. AlexGg Absent Member..
Absent Member..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

If it says somewhere, do you know where and in which document?
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Absent Member.. ntt00015 Absent Member..
Absent Member..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

Sorry, could not remember where it is. It might be in the Installation Guide or Administrator Guide. But without this if you think about the Java Performance issue I think Unix systems are more suitable for Java(thats my opinion by the way). 

 

Please read the "Sizing Central for Workload" part in the admin guide. According to the article, the operating system processor architecture(x86/x64) is one of the important issues for the performance.

It may help you.

 


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Honored Contributor.. RiverRat_1 Honored Contributor..
Honored Contributor..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

Something to consider here which the guides don't really discuss as heavily as they should is the RAS elements.   When talking to external entities RAS is what does all the work to those external entities (SSH, Exchange, HPSM, HPSA, WSDLs, whatever ...).

 

If you have a 100% Unix/Linux environment and have no plans to integrate directly with Windows based elements, then you'll likely be fine with HPOO on Linux and any additional RAS instances you setup on Linux.

 

However, if you plan to write flows to anything that has a .NET components in-it/around-it/dependant-on-it, you'll need a RAS instance installed on Windows.  

 

Having RAS on Windows can mean two things:

 

1) You install HPOO on Windows which means your RAS service that automagically gets installed with it will have the .NET integrations you need.   In older version of HPOO this was called the NRAS service.  NRAS features include the necessary .NET integrations as well as the usual Unix/Linux level features provided in what was called JRAS.

 

2) You install HPOO on RHEL.  The RAS in this case is the JRAS-feature varient aka its missing the .NET integration bits.   You setup a Windows machine to be a RAS Server (which means it has the NRAS features you need).   There is tweaking you need to do get HPOO to recognize this new RAS instance - see below.

 

Adding additional RAS resources into your environment does have impact on how you utilize them from a flow standpoint and globally within the RAS Path but I won't go into that.  This is somewhat discussed in the OO guides.

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Absent Member.. AlexGg Absent Member..
Absent Member..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

I know that thank you.

BTW do you know how in some details RAS installed on Windows going to execute JRAS and NRAS requests from OO Central if it's on Linux?

Is NRAS will be called from RAS on windows?

How about JRAS?

Sorry if those are silly questions for you.

 

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Honored Contributor.. RiverRat_1 Honored Contributor..
Honored Contributor..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

Central talks to a RAS via the RAS Path in system configuration.  Central can determine if the RAS is NRAS based or JRAS based.  The RAS instance itself doesn't care so much what the OO Central is installed on.

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Absent Member.. AlexGg Absent Member..
Absent Member..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

Does it mean that all/each request for RAS came from Central via path to RAS server and RAS server use either NRAS or JRAS? If NRAS - it call it from RAS server, if JRAS it send back to call from Central?
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Honored Contributor.. RiverRat_1 Honored Contributor..
Honored Contributor..

Re: Central OS: Win or *nix?

Think of RAS instances as standalone resources which is what they are.   Central passes them something and says "Validate this" or "Execute this" or whatever.  The RAS (whether its a NRAS or JRAS varient) does what it was asked and returns.  The RASes sit there and wait for work.  So if you have a Windows RAS installed on a separate machine and your Central is installed on Linux and your RAS path is pointing to the RAS on your Linux Central server, then when the RAS is asked to validate say an Exchange step it will come back with exceptions as that RAS doesn't have the necessary .NET elements in it.

 

In this type of setup, if you change your RAS Path to point to the Windows RAS, then everything will work.  The RAS running on the Linux Central server will never get used from that point on.  Technically you could shut it down as you're not using it.

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