Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.
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Databases and momentum

Which DBEs do you think have the most momentum nowadays? Which are on the
downward slide?

Oracle, MySQL, MSSQL, Oracle? Btrieve? 🙂

Which are being ripped out and which are being implemented?



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25 Replies
Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: Databases and momentum

Well I know one that's not going away any time soon:

MS SQL.

MS pretty much forces you to use it in any of their products, and since MS stuff is "everywhere" these days . . .
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

On Tue, 2010-01-12 at 20:42 +0000, Craig wrote:
> Which DBEs do you think have the most momentum nowadays? Which are on the
> downward slide?
>
> Oracle, MySQL, MSSQL, Oracle? Btrieve? 🙂
>
> Which are being ripped out and which are being implemented?


I know as an ISV we have to test against:

MSSQL
Oracle
DB2
MySQL

(various versions of each)

We do not test Postgres (or variants thereof), though
internally, most of us techies like the feature set.


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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

The last two or three 'commercial' apps we deployed were all SQL Server.
On the open source side it is exclusively MySQL. We still have some Oracle,
but the associated costs are getting tougher to justify. With Oracle now
holding MySQL's leash I'm starting to look at others. The recession has
pretty much nuked the budget, not sure when IT spending might return.



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Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: Databases and momentum

Personally I've had more stability issues with MySQL than with Postgres. But a lot of things support MySQL and not necessarily Postgres.
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

What recession? 🙂

"GofBorg" <GofBorg@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote in message
news:2L53n.3900$q93.140@kovat.provo.novell.com...
> The last two or three 'commercial' apps we deployed were all SQL Server.
> On the open source side it is exclusively MySQL. We still have some
> Oracle,
> but the associated costs are getting tougher to justify. With Oracle now
> holding MySQL's leash I'm starting to look at others. The recession has
> pretty much nuked the budget, not sure when IT spending might return.
>
>
>



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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

Anybody keen on dot net?


"Craig" <elrushbo@eib.net> wrote in message
news:e953n.3895$q93.2918@kovat.provo.novell.com...
> Which DBEs do you think have the most momentum nowadays? Which are on the
> downward slide?
>
> Oracle, MySQL, MSSQL, Oracle? Btrieve? 🙂
>
> Which are being ripped out and which are being implemented?
>
>
>



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adrockk Frequent Contributor.
Frequent Contributor.

Re: Databases and momentum

Craig wrote:

> Anybody keen on dot net?


Keen on seeing it DIAF, and taking mono with it!

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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

Mono! 🙂
"Adam Gabriel" <adrockk@no-mx.forums.novell.com> wrote in message
news:FX73n.3952$q93.3373@kovat.provo.novell.com...
> Craig wrote:
>
>> Anybody keen on dot net?

>
> Keen on seeing it DIAF, and taking mono with it!



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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

Craig wrote:

> Anybody keen on dot net?


..Net isn't a db, it's a framework.

And I think it is a very good framework to push out little helper
applications quickly and easily, especially with version 3.x + WPF and
WCF. Version 4 looks very good with the ability to easily parallelise
the processing of aspects of your code.


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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

Thanks for that. I kinda knew that, but can you expound? How does dot net
fit in to the grand scheme?

Thanks!
"Scott Campbell" <potato@potato.potato> wrote in message
news:bs83n.3963$q93.3748@kovat.provo.novell.com...
> Craig wrote:
>
>> Anybody keen on dot net?

>
> .Net isn't a db, it's a framework.
>
> And I think it is a very good framework to push out little helper
> applications quickly and easily, especially with version 3.x + WPF and
> WCF. Version 4 looks very good with the ability to easily parallelise
> the processing of aspects of your code.
>
>



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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

Craig wrote:

> Thanks for that. I kinda knew that, but can you expound? How does
> dot net fit in to the grand scheme?


No worries.

..Net is kind-of like a group of .dlls exposing and abstracting APIs and
functionality - though it is much more encompassing than that. It is
very similar to the classes in Java.

..Net itself is for managed code, like Java, it has a garbage collector
that cleans up objects that are no longer being referenced in code.
You don't have memory pointers any more so it creates a development
environment where the more common programming errors are much less
likely to occur.

For example in C++ if you wanted to manage the lifetime of an object
you'd do something like:
myClass *myClassPtr = new myClass();
<do some stuff with myClass>
delete myClass;

So you create the object, then you have to delete the object when you
are finished with it. In non-managed code it is extremely easy to have
multiple code paths and potentially delete the object multiple times,
or not delete it at all.
With managed code, the objects are cleaned up by the framework
automatically when they are no-longer referenced.

..Net also abstracts the API set and IMO makes it a lot more consistent
(this is very noticable with the GUI controls under WPF) and makes them
a lot easier to use.

There are features such as Linq in later versions which allows you to
manipulate collections of information in a fashion similar to SQL.
So what would normally be a case of


for(int i = 0; i < list.Count-1; i++)
{
if(strcmp(list.Name, desiredName) == 0)
{
desiredObject = list;
break;
}
}

could be written simply as:
var desiredObject = from currentObject in list where currentObject.Name
= desiredName select currentObject;


Because of better consistency and the functions and properties that are
provided it means that development becomes fairly quick and easy, you
typically don't need to write anywhere near the same amount of code as
you would with non-managed code.

To give you an idea, it took me the better part of 2 days to get an
LDAP authentication scheme running properly for a server app written in
C++. Under .Net with C# it took a couple of hours.
It was part of a project that took weeks to write, it was largely
rewritten in C# using .Net over 2-3 days. The rewrite is easier to
read, maintain and far less buggy because there is just a fraction of
the lines of code to achieve the same thing.

Because a lot of logic is handled within the framework, you also get
the advantages of having some of Microsofts top coders working on ways
to optimise code that you would normally have to do yourself. When
..Net is updated, you get to take advantage of the improvements
automatically (I noticed significant graphics improvements in a client
application when going from .Net 3.5 to .Net 3.5sp1).

There are much much more benefits too. I liked the .Net framework up
to 2; .Net 3.0 and more specifically 3.5 are some of the best things
that have come out of Microsoft IMO.

As for the scheme, it's really there to provide a rich, consistent,
easy and quick development experience for ISVs.

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jmarton2 Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

On Tue, 12 Jan 2010 20:42:50 +0000, Craig wrote:

> Which DBEs do you think have the most momentum nowadays?


dBase



--
Joe
With great power comes great responsibility.

Joe Marton Emeritus Knowledge Partner
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

Joseph Marton wrote:
> On Tue, 12 Jan 2010 20:42:50 +0000, Craig wrote:
>
>> Which DBEs do you think have the most momentum nowadays?

>
> dBase


dBase II

Not enough benefit moving to dBase III (too much hype... similar
to moving away from PC-DOS).
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Databases and momentum

My money's on Foxpro.
"cjcox" <cjcox@no-mx.forums.novell.com> wrote in message
news:Kyl3n.4100$q93.1901@kovat.provo.novell.com...
> Joseph Marton wrote:
>> On Tue, 12 Jan 2010 20:42:50 +0000, Craig wrote:
>>
>>> Which DBEs do you think have the most momentum nowadays?

>>
>> dBase

>
> dBase II
>
> Not enough benefit moving to dBase III (too much hype... similar
> to moving away from PC-DOS).



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