Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Doing the civic duty

Yesterday, I served as a juror in a criminal trial. It was interesting.

The case was a man in his fifties accused of battery on his sister and
aggravated assault on his niece's husband. We had 7 witnesses,
including the accused. We ended up convicting him of battery (all 7
witnesses said it happened) and acquitting him of the aggravated
assault. We just couldn't make all of the conflicting testimony work out.

There were a lot of things that no one talked about until we spoke with
the judge & attorneys afterwards, such as the fact that this was a
long-standing family feud that drew the notice of people outside the
family. They were described as "a well-known, not prominent, family in
the county". None of the people involved came off in a positive light.

I ended up as the presiding juror/forewoman because no one else was
willing to do it, because it meant their name would be entered into
court records. *shrug* Someone has to do it, and I was willing.

The judge said that the defendant will do about 6 months in county jail
and pay a fine, because he has a long history of such problems.

I'm glad I've done it. I don't feel an overwhelming need to do it
again. But, if I'm called, I'll serve.


--
Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you
nothing. It was here first. ~Mark Twain
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Re: Doing the civic duty

I was able to get out of jury duty last time I was called. Now before
somebody gets to bashing me for not doing my "civic duty" I had good
reason and that's all I will say about that.

Beth Cole wrote:
> Yesterday, I served as a juror in a criminal trial. It was interesting.
>
> The case was a man in his fifties accused of battery on his sister and
> aggravated assault on his niece's husband. We had 7 witnesses,
> including the accused. We ended up convicting him of battery (all 7
> witnesses said it happened) and acquitting him of the aggravated
> assault. We just couldn't make all of the conflicting testimony work out.
>
> There were a lot of things that no one talked about until we spoke with
> the judge & attorneys afterwards, such as the fact that this was a
> long-standing family feud that drew the notice of people outside the
> family. They were described as "a well-known, not prominent, family in
> the county". None of the people involved came off in a positive light.
>
> I ended up as the presiding juror/forewoman because no one else was
> willing to do it, because it meant their name would be entered into
> court records. *shrug* Someone has to do it, and I was willing.
>
> The judge said that the defendant will do about 6 months in county jail
> and pay a fine, because he has a long history of such problems.
>
> I'm glad I've done it. I don't feel an overwhelming need to do it
> again. But, if I'm called, I'll serve.
>
>



--
Matthew - The Great System Tyrant
--------------------------------------
http://www.mattography.net/
http://www.matthewdgood.com/
http://www.systemtyrant.com/
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Re: Doing the civic duty

Matthew wrote:
> I was able to get out of jury duty last time I was called. Now before
> somebody gets to bashing me for not doing my "civic duty" I had good
> reason and that's all I will say about that.
>


I've never been called for jury duty. I feel rejected 😐

Ted Novak
TRA#5512
IEAS#75
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Re: Doing the civic duty

Beth Cole wrote:

> Yesterday, I served as a juror in a criminal trial. It was interesting.


My husband got a jury notice last week, but he cannot serve because he is
not a citizen.

I mistakely thought that he could vote for non "federal" elections, but
after looking it over, that's not the case.

--
Danita
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Re: Doing the civic duty

I call you for jury duty. I want you to be one of the twelve angry men. 😛

§ wrote:
> Matthew wrote:
>> I was able to get out of jury duty last time I was called. Now before
>> somebody gets to bashing me for not doing my "civic duty" I had good
>> reason and that's all I will say about that.
>>

>
> I've never been called for jury duty. I feel rejected 😐
>
> Ted Novak
> TRA#5512
> IEAS#75



--
Matthew - The Great System Tyrant
--------------------------------------
http://www.mattography.net/
http://www.matthewdgood.com/
http://www.systemtyrant.com/
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Re: Doing the civic duty

On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 15:45:30 +0000, Beth Cole wrote:

> Yesterday, I served as a juror in a criminal trial.


I got to serve on a coroner's jury once. That was pretty cool. The best
part, though, at least in DuPage County IL is that you only have to serve
one day and then you are free. You aren't on "standby" or whatever you
call it the rest of the week having to call in each day to find out if you
have to go in or not. You just do coroner's jury for one day and that's
it.

--
Joe
"Those of you who think you know everything are annoying to those of us who do."

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Re: Doing the civic duty

Matthew wrote:
> I call you for jury duty. I want you to be one of the twelve angry men. 😛
>


Hopefully I won't get that........

--
Romey

Quote: “Not now chief... I'm in the zone!!!!”
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Re: Doing the civic duty

On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 15:54:24 +0000, Matthew wrote:

> I was able to get out of jury duty last time I was called. Now before
> somebody gets to bashing me for not doing my "civic duty" I had good
> reason and that's all I will say about that.


I've been called twice; got out of it once (I knew one of the defense
attorneys), and served once. I enjoyed the experience, actually - but it
was a single-day case.

My wife got called for federal jury duty, but didn't serve (for a very
good reason which I won't go into); federal duty gets you out of anything
"lesser" (state, etc.) for a period of time (2-3 years IIRC). However,
she's also been called to serve at our polling place - last time she was
the one who programmed the cards, this time she's the poll book judge.

She really enjoyed the experience the first time, and is looking forward
to the next one.

Jim
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Re: Doing the civic duty

Matthew wrote:
> I was able to get out of jury duty last time I was called. Now
> before somebody gets to bashing me for not doing my "civic duty" I
> had good reason and that's all I will say about that.


In that case, surely you didn't "get out of it", you weren't able to
serve 🙂 To "get out of it" seems (to me) to imply shirking one's
duties, as opposed to being dismissed for good reason...

--
Regards,
Ben A L Jemmett
http://flatpack.microwavepizza.co.uk/
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Re: Doing the civic duty

Beth
> But, if I'm called, I'll serve.


Nice one.
I've not yet been called for jury duty, but I wouldn't hesitate in
attending.

Michael
--
"This is the curse of Jeff Murdoch. I meet the woman of my dreams and I
can't take my trousers off."
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Re: Doing the civic duty

MichaelC <michael@address.invalid> expounded:
> Beth
> > But, if I'm called, I'll serve.


> Nice one.
> I've not yet been called for jury duty, but I wouldn't hesitate in
> attending.


Neither would I. I also doubt I'd survive a jury interview if the lawyers
decide to do that. I've done the "impartial official" schtick before,
though not in a legal context. If I'm not prone to be swayed by emotion,
then I'm not a friendly juror.

But, if called (and I have yet to be) I'd go. It'd be interesting.

--
--Borg Consulate--
Tape backup, the bane of my existance
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Re: Doing the civic duty

On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 20:17:07 +0000, Victor of Borg wrote:

> Neither would I. I also doubt I'd survive a jury interview if the
> lawyers decide to do that. I've done the "impartial official" schtick
> before, though not in a legal context. If I'm not prone to be swayed by
> emotion, then I'm not a friendly juror.


In some cases, that is a benefit - besides, if they dismiss all the ones
they're allowed and you're still left, then you're in anyways.

Jim
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Re: Doing the civic duty

Victor of Borg wrote:
> Neither would I. I also doubt I'd survive a jury interview if the lawyers
> decide to do that. I've done the "impartial official" schtick before,
> though not in a legal context. If I'm not prone to be swayed by emotion,
> then I'm not a friendly juror.


I got asked yesterday about how long I'd worked at the hospital (13
years in August), if I'd ever worked in the ER (yes, as a clerk 11 years
ago) and how long I've lived at our current address (just over a month).
The defense attorney asked about hobbies, I said cooking & reading.
Then he asked if I liked to bake. I shrugged and said I knew how but
didn't do much of it. He asked what would happen if I went to make a
cake and used baking powder instead of baking soda. I said that the
cake wouldn't be right. Which was his point... It had to do with
something he was trying to make sure everyone understood, and my juror
information sheet gave him an opening to use my knowledge to make the
point. The fact that, by profession, I can't allow myself a great deal
of emotional involvement in what I'm hearing and seeing didn't sway
things one way or another.

> But, if called (and I have yet to be) I'd go. It'd be interesting.


This was the second jury I'd served on. The first go-round, the
defendant was remanded back to the custody of a psych facility, for his
sixth or seventh psych eval. He'd been charged with the theft of more
the $1K worth of tobacco products from a convenience store.

Jury duty in this small town is a regular occurance for most of us. The
state says that we serve jury duty for the length of one day or one
trial. One day if we don't get selected, one trial if we do. It just
so happened that this time my trial only lasted a day.

One of my best friends had to serve on a jury for a criminal case that
lasted just short of 3 weeks. She was severely depressed by the case
and was close to suicidal before it was all done, and she said no one
else on the jury was in any better shape than she was. Listening to the
testimony that they had to was very demoralizing, because the defendant
had been allowed to continue a pattern of behavior for close to 15
years, victimizing a series of teenagers. It wasn't until the parents
of his latest victim were able to obtain usable evidence that he was
arrested & tried. She said the jury deliberations took them almost 3
hours, mostly because of the number of places the presiding juror had to
sign for the convictions.



--
Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you
nothing. It was here first. ~Mark Twain
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Re: Doing the civic duty

I keep getting peremptorily dismissed by the defense lawyers because I
admit to getting most of my news from newspapers and magazines. That and
having friends and relatives who are judges and lawyers seems to get me
dismissed. Even in the Army, I kept getting waived off Courts-martial
boards for whatever. 😞

§ wrote:
> Matthew wrote:
>> I was able to get out of jury duty last time I was called. Now before
>> somebody gets to bashing me for not doing my "civic duty" I had good
>> reason and that's all I will say about that.
>>

>
> I've never been called for jury duty. I feel rejected 😐
>
> Ted Novak
> TRA#5512
> IEAS#75

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Re: Doing the civic duty

Jim Henderson <nospam@nospam.com> expounded:
> On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 20:17:07 +0000, Victor of Borg wrote:


> > Neither would I. I also doubt I'd survive a jury interview if the
> > lawyers decide to do that. I've done the "impartial official" schtick
> > before, though not in a legal context. If I'm not prone to be swayed by
> > emotion, then I'm not a friendly juror.


> In some cases, that is a benefit - besides, if they dismiss all the ones
> they're allowed and you're still left, then you're in anyways.


Yeah, I know it's a benefit. Beth just described a case like that. I just
know that such experience can be deemed undesirable by some ;).

--
--Borg Consulate--
Tape backup, the bane of my existance
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