Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.
1650 views

Huh!

Maybe I'm just stupid, but I don't understand ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/08/24/occidental-college-offers_n_267202.html

Donald Albury
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17 Replies
LarryMateo Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

Philosophy: That branch of academia that allows one to bake dough in the shape of a pretzel and yet call it a breadstick.
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

On Mon, 24 Aug 2009 23:36:01 GMT, LarryMateo
<LarryMateo@no-mx.forums.novell.com> wrote:

>
>Philosophy: That branch of academia that allows one to bake dough in the
>shape of a pretzel and yet call it a breadstick.


I got a 'D' in the only Philosophy course I took. I gave the wrong answer
to the question, "If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does
it make a sound?"

Donald Albury
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

Donald Albury,

>
> I got a 'D' in the only Philosophy course I took. I gave the wrong answer
> to the question, "If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does
> it make a sound?"
>


There's only one wrong answer in all of philosophy: the one that
contradicts whoever is giving the exam.

You're better off staying away from philosophy though; stick with it and
you'll likely end up like this guy:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wellohorld/2732005043/


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Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: Huh!

Amen to that (haha)

Sounds like most of my Humanities & Social Science teachers in college - write what we want you to write, agree with me and you'll get an A.

DougB;1846330 wrote:
Donald Albury,

>
> I got a 'D' in the only Philosophy course I took. I gave the wrong answer
> to the question, "If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does
> it make a sound?"
>


There's only one wrong answer in all of philosophy: the one that
contradicts whoever is giving the exam.

You're better off staying away from philosophy though; stick with it and
you'll likely end up like this guy:
I asked him what animal Nietzsche was with when he died. He said, 'If you're talking about the horse, that's not when he died, that's when he went insane. He lived 11 years longer and didn't speak for 4 of them. He finally spoke when his friend asked
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

kjhurni,
>
> Sounds like most of my Humanities & Social Science teachers in college
> - write what we want you to write, agree with me and you'll get an A.
>


That's unfortunate. Good humanities profs grade based on whether you
can make a case for your own interpretation. In other words, feel free
to say "the white whale in _Moby Dick_ represents Melville's fear of the
postman," but you'd better be able to do more than make that bald
assertion.

What's really sad is that at larger schools, the prof never even sees
exams and compositions; they're graded by a T.A. who uses a checklist
provided by the prof. Independent thought never gets a chance in that
environment. Then again, that's what grad school is for.


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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 12:53:15 GMT, DougB <dougdotblack@geemail.com> wrote:

>There's only one wrong answer in all of philosophy: the one that
>contradicts whoever is giving the exam.
>
>You're better off staying away from philosophy though; stick with it and
>you'll likely end up like this guy:
>http://www.flickr.com/photos/wellohorld/2732005043/


For some reason that reminded of a guy I met in the Army: Captain, 82nd
Airborne, Ranger, already had his assignment to be an advisor to a South
Viernamese Ranger Battallion, knowing that every one of his Ranger School
classmates who had gone to Vietnam were already dead. I was complaining
about how useless my English degree had been in getting a job, and he told
me his degree was in Hindu Philosophy.

Donald Albury
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

So, did Kshatriya-dharma do its thing with him, or did he survive
because of karma merit from something good he did before becoming a Ranger?

Kshatriya-dharma was what inspired Krishna to tell Arjuna: "Kill 'em
all, let God sort them out!" in the Bhagavad Gita.

Donald Albury wrote:
> For some reason that reminded of a guy I met in the Army: Captain, 82nd
> Airborne, Ranger, already had his assignment to be an advisor to a South
> Viernamese Ranger Battallion, knowing that every one of his Ranger School
> classmates who had gone to Vietnam were already dead. I was complaining
> about how useless my English degree had been in getting a job, and he told
> me his degree was in Hindu Philosophy.
>
> Donald Albury

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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 21:25:33 GMT, "dan c." <dytcheungDEL@hotmail.com.del>
wrote:

>So, did Kshatriya-dharma do its thing with him, or did he survive
>because of karma merit from something good he did before becoming a Ranger?


I don't know, I didn't stay in touch. Actually I only met with him one
time. He was a captain, I was a spec 4, and we were talking politics
(McGovern campaign, '68), so it was sort of a clandestine meeting. It was
sort of like I didn't want to know what happened to him in Vietnam. I was
introduced to him by a Quaker couple whose son had just volunteered to do
his conscientous objector duty as a medic. I had my orders for Vietnam by
then, but was able to delay them for a couple of months. Knowing those
people made my chances in Vietnam as a clerk look pretty good.

>Kshatriya-dharma was what inspired Krishna to tell Arjuna: "Kill 'em
>all, let God sort them out!" in the Bhagavad Gita.


It seems there is a rival claimant for coining that phrase,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnaud_Amalric, (and I doubt the good monk
had a copy of the Bhagavad Gita).

Donald Albury
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

I have a lot of respect for those conscientious objectors who
volunteered to go. Unfortunately, I don't know of any who came back, all
the ones I heard about, who were medics with infantry battalions, were
KIA. The guys who spoke of them were in complete awe of their physical
and spiritual courage, and were haunted by their deaths.

The Bhagavad Gita was written down around AD 500, although the oral
version has been around longer. However, the sentiment is probably
universal. The Albigensian Heresy brought out some pretty nasty
tendencies in the folks of that age. Fanaticism seems to bring out the
worst in the darker aspects of people.

Donald Albury wrote:
> On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 21:25:33 GMT, "dan c." <dytcheungDEL@hotmail.com.del>
> wrote:
>
>> So, did Kshatriya-dharma do its thing with him, or did he survive
>> because of karma merit from something good he did before becoming a Ranger?

>
> I don't know, I didn't stay in touch. Actually I only met with him one
> time. He was a captain, I was a spec 4, and we were talking politics
> (McGovern campaign, '68), so it was sort of a clandestine meeting. It was
> sort of like I didn't want to know what happened to him in Vietnam. I was
> introduced to him by a Quaker couple whose son had just volunteered to do
> his conscientous objector duty as a medic. I had my orders for Vietnam by
> then, but was able to delay them for a couple of months. Knowing those
> people made my chances in Vietnam as a clerk look pretty good.
>
>> Kshatriya-dharma was what inspired Krishna to tell Arjuna: "Kill 'em
>> all, let God sort them out!" in the Bhagavad Gita.

>
> It seems there is a rival claimant for coining that phrase,
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnaud_Amalric, (and I doubt the good monk
> had a copy of the Bhagavad Gita).
>
> Donald Albury

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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 23:44:05 GMT, "dan c." <dytcheungDEL@hotmail.com.del>
wrote:

>I have a lot of respect for those conscientious objectors who
>volunteered to go. Unfortunately, I don't know of any who came back, all
>the ones I heard about, who were medics with infantry battalions, were
>KIA. The guys who spoke of them were in complete awe of their physical
>and spiritual courage, and were haunted by their deaths.


Anybody who volunteers for medic certainly has my respect.

>The Bhagavad Gita was written down around AD 500, although the oral
>version has been around longer. However, the sentiment is probably
>universal. The Albigensian Heresy brought out some pretty nasty
>tendencies in the folks of that age. Fanaticism seems to bring out the
>worst in the darker aspects of people.


I just finished reading the "The Bible Unearthed" (less than an hour ago,
in fact), and there are a few examples mentioned there, and now I can check
the news ....

Donald Albury
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

I have a couple of versions and I love the very different
interpretations/translations that come out of them.


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