Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

Sanskrit is one of those languages that can layer many meanings on a
word or a phrase that even Indian scholars cannot agree on a definitive
meaning or translation. The illustrated versions of it have pretty cool
pictures.

Miles58 wrote:
> I have a couple of versions and I love the very different
> interpretations/translations that come out of them.
>
>

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 17:33:29 GMT, "dan c." <dytcheungDEL@hotmail.com.del>
wrote:

>Sanskrit is one of those languages that can layer many meanings on a
>word or a phrase that even Indian scholars cannot agree on a definitive
>meaning or translation. The illustrated versions of it have pretty cool
>pictures.


I actually studied Sanskrit. After a year of classes, I could translate
about one sentence an hour.

Donald Albury
0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

It's a fascinating language, like trying to learn Latin or Classical
Greek on steroids, isn't it? I had a professor in college who "highly
recommended" that I learn it. He also thought that while I was at it, I
should also study Pali, Malay and Khmer after I had mastered Sanskrit. I
just nodded politely and wondered what I just got myself into. My
biggest problem was finding people who could tell me what the
differences were between the consonants like "t" and "t with a dot", etc.

Donald Albury wrote:
>
> I actually studied Sanskrit. After a year of classes, I could translate
> about one sentence an hour.
>
> Donald Albury

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

Classic example: Oppenheimer's utterance when the bomb worked.

From a passage I always took to refer to time as a presence. A wholly new
dimension to an ancient concept.that is entirely consistent with the
previous translations.


0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

Exactly, the original passage is:

"Kalo'smi lokakshayakritpravriddho lokansamahartumiha pravrittah|...||"

"Loka..." in the passage can mean "time" or "death" since given enough
time, all things die. Another interpretation is that since Krishna is
the be all and end all, according to himself, he is what was there
before life was conceived and will be there when the universe itself
snuffs out. It's not surprising that Oppenheimer was attracted to the
Gita and he himself studied Sanskrit, since its discussion of cosmology
correlates well with what Einstein and others theorized.

Miles58 wrote:
> Classic example: Oppenheimer's utterance when the bomb worked.
>
> From a passage I always took to refer to time as a presence. A wholly new
> dimension to an ancient concept.that is entirely consistent with the
> previous translations.
>
>

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Huh!

On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 19:12:57 GMT, "dan c." <dytcheungDEL@hotmail.com.del>
wrote:

>It's a fascinating language, like trying to learn Latin or Classical
>Greek on steroids, isn't it? I had a professor in college who "highly
>recommended" that I learn it. He also thought that while I was at it, I
>should also study Pali, Malay and Khmer after I had mastered Sanskrit. I
>just nodded politely and wondered what I just got myself into. My
>biggest problem was finding people who could tell me what the
>differences were between the consonants like "t" and "t with a dot", etc.


And then there are the diphthongs and elisions. Half my 'translation' time
was spent transcribing the Devanagari into Latin letters.

Donald Albury
0 Likes
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of Micro Focus. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation. Certain versions of content ("Material") accessible here may contain branding from Hewlett-Packard Company (now HP Inc.) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company. As of September 1, 2017, the Material is now offered by Micro Focus, a separately owned and operated company. Any reference to the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks is historical in nature, and the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks are the property of their respective owners.