medesignltd Absent Member.
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Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

Our existing ADSL/Broadband service which originally came supplied as standard with 16 static IP addresses is being "regraded" to a newer FTTC service.

We operate from a single site and over the years have only ever used two of the available static IP addresses - one for our internet and VPN traffic and the other for our GW server primary MX record. We are licensed for the Open Workgroup Suite but have never got in to using Filr or Vibe.

The new FTTC service only comes as standard with 1 static IP address.

Just trying to figure out if there are any gotchas or headaches that we might experience further down the line by not having additional IP addresses available or perhaps I'm overthinking this and worrying about nothing?

Any thoughts or suggestions gratefully received.

Neil
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Knowledge Partner
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Re: Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

medesignltd wrote:

> Just trying to figure out if there are any gotchas or headaches that
> we might experience further down the line by not having additional IP
> addresses available or perhaps I'm overthinking this and worrying
> about nothing?


Hi Neil,

Whether or not a single IP address will work for you really depends on
what you are trying to accomplish.


Outgoing traffic, even from multiple devices, is no problem and can be
accomplished easily using NAT or masquerading. As you might suspect the
issue is with incoming traffic.

For someone to access a service on your server from the Internet two
things are needed:
- a public IP address
- a port


Let's assume the following:
- 10.3.2.1 is your public IP address.
- 192.168.1.1 is server 1.
- 192.168.1.2 is server 2.

Also, let's assume the public needs to access your email server and
your web server via your public IP address.
- 10.3.2.1:25
- 10.3.2.1:80


With a front end router you can do quite a bit with a single IP address
by using port forwarding:
<src IP>:<src port> --> <dst IP>:<dst port>

So you can easily do this:
10.3.2.1:25 --> 192.168.1.1:25
10.3.2.1:80 --> 192.168.1.1:80

Or this:
10.3.2.1:25 --> 192.168.1.1:25
10.3.2.1:80 --> 192.168.1.2:80

If you need web access to different servers to manage them you may be
able to set them up to listen on different ports or you could, again,
use port redirection:
10.3.2.1:44180 --> 192.168.1.1:80
10.3.2.1:44280 --> 192.168.1.2:80

The issue you will face is if you need two instances of a single
service such as two public websites both of which have to be accessible
at port 80.

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medesignltd Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

Hi Kevin,

Many thanks for the helpful reply.

We're a relatively small site so the front end router and port forwarding scenarios you have set out are already in use where required.

And we've never needed (so far) two instances of a single service which have to be accessible at the same port..... but that doesn't mean it couldn't happen in the future.

Just trying to make sure we don't get caught short further down the line with some fundamental service or function (at the small business or Open Workgroup Suite level) that demands two (or more) unique static IP addresses.

Thanks again for your advice.

Neil
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Re: Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

medesignltd wrote:

> Just trying to make sure we don't get caught short further down the
> line with some fundamental service or function (at the small business
> or Open Workgroup Suite level) that demands two (or more) unique
> static IP addresses.


Hi Neil,

Unfortunately, there are no guarantees. 😞

I am going through the same process. I've had a block of sixteen IP
addresses for the past fifteen years and at one time had a half dozen
in use. My configuration has changed and while I'm still using a number
of different addresses, a single IP address is all I really need now.
Still, it's comforting to know the others are available should I need
them.

In my case, I'm changing my ISP. I'm upgrading from 25 Mbps service to
150 Mbps service while reducing my monthly cost by almost twenty five
percent. It's really a no brainer. The only catch is the single IP
address.

Should I really need an additional IP address sometime down the road, I
will deal with that issue at that time:
- I may be able to get them from my ISP at that time.
- Perhaps I could provide the service via the cloud.
- or use an external proxy server to redirect traffic to a different
port.

There are always options. Until the specific details are available all
we can do is speculate.


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Kevin Boyle - Knowledge Partner
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Re: Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

In article <xul8E.3037$C62.1452@novprvlin0914.provo.novell.com>, Kevin
Boyle wrote:
> The only catch is the single IP
> address.


Well that is only a single IPv4. I'm sure you can have a few million
IPv6 addresses, so learning how to use them might be a good thing.
I've been on that path, though it sure has its own learning curve.


Andy of
http://KonecnyConsulting.ca in Toronto
Knowledge Partner
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Re: Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

Andy Konecny wrote:

> Well that is only a single IPv4. I'm sure you can have a few million
> IPv6 addresses


Certainly there are many more IPv6 addresses available than there are
IPv4 addresses but what it comes down to is what the ISP can or will
provide and at what cost.

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Kevin Boyle - Knowledge Partner
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Re: Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

In article <S6CdE.3399$C62.3033@novprvlin0914.provo.novell.com>, Kevin
Boyle wrote:
> Certainly there are many more IPv6 addresses available than there are
> IPv4 addresses but what it comes down to is what the ISP can or will
> provide and at what cost.


And if the ISP doesn't have some IPv6 flowing yet, they need to be
kicked about it. Mobile phones are already often running on IPv6
already here in the land of more than half the IPv4. Poking your ISP
about their IPv6 support is worth while.


Andy of
http://KonecnyConsulting.ca in Toronto
Knowledge Partner
http://forums.novell.com/member.php/75037-konecnya
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ScorpionSting Absent Member.
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Re: Single or Multiple Static IP Addresses

konecnya;2496101 wrote:
In article <S6CdE.3399$C62.3033@novprvlin0914.provo.novell.com>, Kevin
Boyle wrote:
> Certainly there are many more IPv6 addresses available than there are
> IPv4 addresses but what it comes down to is what the ISP can or will
> provide and at what cost.


And if the ISP doesn't have some IPv6 flowing yet, they need to be
kicked about it. Mobile phones are already often running on IPv6
already here in the land of more than half the IPv4. Poking your ISP
about their IPv6 support is worth while.


Andy of
http://KonecnyConsulting.ca in Toronto
Knowledge Partner
http://forums.novell.com/member.php/75037-konecnya
If you find a post helpful and are logged in the Web interface, please
show your appreciation by clicking on the star below. Thanks!


I've been looking around for IPv6 enabled ISPs here in Australia....and there aren't many at all.....those that do offer IPv6 will force IPv4 CNAT which just makes it kind of useless when trying to dual stack services....can't win.

I think PAT is going to be my friend for some time yet...

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