shaunpond Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

Lindsey,

🙂

--

Shaun Pond


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shaunpond Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

Barry,

the good news is that I had to go and Google that to find out what it
was

--

Shaun Pond


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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

The really bad news is that they advertise that stuff on TV and in
periodicals. Advertising prescription medications in non-medical
publications and TV/radio used to be forbidden, now it's a major
contributor to out-of-control drug prices, second only to pharmaceutical
industry lobbying expenses.

Shaun Pond wrote:
> Barry,
>
> the good news is that I had to go and Google that to find out what it
> was
>

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shaunpond Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

Dan,

not in this country

--

Shaun Pond


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BSchnur Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

> the good news is that I had to go and Google that to find out what it
> was


Indeed -- it is when you get informed of things like this from your
partner that concern should form.



--
Barry Schnur
Former Novell Support Connection Volunteer Sysop

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BSchnur Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

> The really bad news is that they advertise that stuff on TV and in
> periodicals. Advertising prescription medications in non-medical
> publications and TV/radio used to be forbidden, now it's a major
> contributor to out-of-control drug prices, second only to pharmaceutical
> industry lobbying expenses.
>

Agreed big time. It used to be that big pharma used agressive 'detail
men (or women)' to push new drugs on physicians. The deal was there
were all sorts of valuable spiffs provided to doctors who prescribed
certain medications at certain levels within their practice. That was
frowned upon and controlled. So, big pharma found (for them and the
advertising universe) another way.

The first approach might have seemed a bit 'messy' or 'dirty' but it was
much less expensive, actually provided information (biased at times of
course) to the physicians, and meant doctors could avoid a fair number
of non productive (and non-compensated) time with patients explaining
why snake oil one with the free ginzu knives was no more effective (and
a lot more expensive) than an existing (and by now generic) medication.

My wife's an MD and when those ads hit it is eye-roll city.



--
Barry Schnur
Former Novell Support Connection Volunteer Sysop

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BSchnur Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

> not in this country

One of many superior aspects of the UK.


--
Barry Schnur
Former Novell Support Connection Volunteer Sysop

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

Barry Schnur wrote:
>> The really bad news is that they advertise that stuff on TV and in
>> periodicals. Advertising prescription medications in non-medical
>> publications and TV/radio used to be forbidden, now it's a major
>> contributor to out-of-control drug prices, second only to pharmaceutical
>> industry lobbying expenses.
>>

> Agreed big time. It used to be that big pharma used agressive 'detail
> men (or women)' to push new drugs on physicians. The deal was there
> were all sorts of valuable spiffs provided to doctors who prescribed
> certain medications at certain levels within their practice. That was
> frowned upon and controlled. So, big pharma found (for them and the
> advertising universe) another way.
>
> The first approach might have seemed a bit 'messy' or 'dirty' but it was
> much less expensive, actually provided information (biased at times of
> course) to the physicians, and meant doctors could avoid a fair number
> of non productive (and non-compensated) time with patients explaining
> why snake oil one with the free ginzu knives was no more effective (and
> a lot more expensive) than an existing (and by now generic) medication.
>
> My wife's an MD and when those ads hit it is eye-roll city.
>
>
>


And all this has spawned the most humongous class action suits ever
taken on. I only know this because the law firm I work at specializes
in such.

I was once told that there are only two countries in the world that
allow prescription drug advertisement on tv, USA and New Zealand.
Haven't been able to verify that though.

Ted Novak
TRA#5512
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shaunpond Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

Barry,

just a matter of time

--

Shaun Pond


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shaunpond Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

Barry,

:@)

--

Shaun Pond


0 Likes
BSchnur Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

Yes, lots of lawsuits since the disclaimers on the TV ads don't work
(sort of like listening to the radio ads on new car deals when in the
last 7 seconds, all the financial term disclaimers are read at a VERY
HIGH baud rate). It used to be that doctors actually got some real
information (and got paid to get it). But these days, the doctors at
the 'sharp end' as it were are not all that well compensated (eg, my
wife as a psychiatrist, gets less than $100 per patient visit -- that
visit entails 45 minutes of direct patient contact plus all the
administrative time to handling billing, reporting and the like).

--
Barry Schnur
Former Novell Support Connection Volunteer Sysop

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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

You're lucky. Just hope that when you visit here that you won't need
medical services or prescription drugs. I just got my bill for a four
day hospital stay which included an MRI, prescription pain killers and
microsurgery; $1750.00, of which my union membership health plan covered
all but $600. But I'm still stuck with $600 I'm responsible for.
Solidarity Forever, baby!!!

Shaun Pond wrote:
> Dan,
>
> not in this country
>

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

YIKES!!! 😉

Barry Schnur wrote:
>> the good news is that I had to go and Google that to find out what it
>> was

>
> Indeed -- it is when you get informed of things like this from your
> partner that concern should form.
>
>
>

0 Likes
BSchnur Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

> You're lucky. Just hope that when you visit here that you won't need
> medical services or prescription drugs. I just got my bill for a four
> day hospital stay which included an MRI, prescription pain killers and
> microsurgery; $1750.00, of which my union membership health plan covered
> all but $600. But I'm still stuck with $600 I'm responsible for.
> Solidarity Forever, baby!!!
>

Did you get to look at the original (pre insurance) bill? I bet it was
a lot higher than $1750.



--
Barry Schnur
Former Novell Support Connection Volunteer Sysop

0 Likes
Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: the joy of lysdexia

OOPS! Fat-fingered the amount. It should be *$7,150.00*, not the lesser
amount I erroneously typed.

dan c. wrote:
> ... $1750.00, of which my union membership health plan covered
> all but $600...

0 Likes
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