Absent Member.. Vg_2 Absent Member..
Absent Member..
465 views

Problem and KnownError

Jump to solution

Hi,

 

I would like to understand why there is a seperate record for Known Error when you can do and manage it with Problem ticket itself.

 

1. Problem Ticket can be used to capture the workaround and the permanent fix.

2. OOB Change ticket cannot be created out of Problem Ticket which is available only in KE record.

3. In case of knowledge, Problem ticket can be promoted as knowledge candidate where in the solution in the problem ticket can be used instead of having a seperate KE record.

4. having a seperate KE record increases the over head to the Problem Management and it would have been simpler if the capabilities of KE are incorporated in the Problem Ticket itself.

 

Regards,

Viji

0 Likes
1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Absent Member.. John Stagaman Absent Member..
Absent Member..

Re: Problem and KnownError

Jump to solution

Known Errors are a separate record because a single problem may have multiple contributing Known Errors, each of which may be worked by a different team and require a different change to resolve.

 

For example, let's say users report slow response for an application:

  • A known error could be idenfied that new indexes are needed, the database team would own the KE and implement the fix.
  • However, additionally it was idenfied that the application server has insufficient shared memory, and a second KE to update the application configuration is created and resolved via change.
  • Third, a known error is opened because their is a known defect in the product that can also contribute to slow response but the KE cannot be resolved until a fix is provided from the vendor.
----------------------------------------------------
Kudos - what, where, how, and why
Want Good Answers? Ask Good Questions...
3 Replies
Piku Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Problem and KnownError

Jump to solution
Hi,

1)It is as per ITIL workflow and off-course you can postany related ticket details in any of the ticket.
2) I suppose it already there OOB inboth KE and PM, if not so you can add.
3) & 4) All is as per ITIL and it is easy to maintain separated KE if there could be number of solution/errosr. Also same KE can be attached to another Problem record if found same type of resolution/error.


hth
____________________________________
Assign Kudo, if found post useful and mark it accepted if solves the issue.
Absent Member.. John Stagaman Absent Member..
Absent Member..

Re: Problem and KnownError

Jump to solution

Known Errors are a separate record because a single problem may have multiple contributing Known Errors, each of which may be worked by a different team and require a different change to resolve.

 

For example, let's say users report slow response for an application:

  • A known error could be idenfied that new indexes are needed, the database team would own the KE and implement the fix.
  • However, additionally it was idenfied that the application server has insufficient shared memory, and a second KE to update the application configuration is created and resolved via change.
  • Third, a known error is opened because their is a known defect in the product that can also contribute to slow response but the KE cannot be resolved until a fix is provided from the vendor.
----------------------------------------------------
Kudos - what, where, how, and why
Want Good Answers? Ask Good Questions...
VVV Frequent Contributor.
Frequent Contributor.

Re: Problem and KnownError

Jump to solution

Hi,

in the SM help for KnownErrors there is information (https://docs.microfocus.com/SM/9.41/Codeless/Content/problem/concepts/known_errors.htm😞

Problem records reside in the rootcause table; known error records reside in the knownerror and rootcause tables.

The question is:

- why known errors exist in 2 tables: rootcause and knownerror? and how to operate with them when they are in 2 tables?

0 Likes
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of Micro Focus. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation. Certain versions of content ("Material") accessible here may contain branding from Hewlett-Packard Company (now HP Inc.) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company. As of September 1, 2017, the Material is now offered by Micro Focus, a separately owned and operated company. Any reference to the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks is historical in nature, and the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks are the property of their respective owners.