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How can I recover from a failed VCM commit?

How can I recover from a failed VCM commit?

If a VCM commit fails, and is deemed unrecoverable under any circumstances, the session needs to be restarted (if at process item scope) or thrown away and a new session run (at full scope)
Doing so guarantees that all manual changes made to the session (manual file merges and changes to default actions) will be lost. While changes to default actions cannot be recovered, manual file merges are salvageable.

To recover from this the following actions can be taken:

Run the original session in the Test Perspective, map the merge preview alternate path to the path of either the source or the target view, checkout the merged content to the working folders, and force check the changed content into the selected view.

If the force checkins are made into the source view, then the next VCM session run from the source to the target view will pick up the merged content as the new starting point of the merge.

If the force checkins are made into the source view, then the next VCM session will ignore these files, unless a VCM session is run from the target to the source immediately after the force checkins.

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