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ZCM 11.2.3a + Tuxera = corrupted DeepFreeze v7 Persis0.dsk

When taking an image of a machine via PXE boot, the imaging process whips by the 10GB C:\Persis0.dsk file that is actually the "ThawSpace0" partition mapped to drive V: in the Windows 7 Pro OS. Of "real" data, there's probably about 200MB's worth of files in there. At any rate, even though the file appears as the original 10GB file once the Restore is complete, I cannot access that "V:" drive mapped to the 10GB Thawspace0, as the OS now reports it is corrupted. Running CHKDSK just for fun doesn't help.

When I take an image of the same machine again, but select the "Legacy" checkbox on the PXE screen, then the process seems to pick up that C:\Persis0.dsk file just fine. Currently, I am finishing up taking this 30GB image. Hopefully, the "Legacy" option will have done the trick, but I thought I'd run this past you guys for any opinions...? Thanks!
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Re: ZCM 11.2.3a + Tuxera = corrupted DeepFreeze v7 Persis0.d

spaschall;2273959 wrote:
When taking an image of a machine via PXE boot, the imaging process whips by the 10GB C:\Persis0.dsk file that is actually the "ThawSpace0" partition mapped to drive V: in the Windows 7 Pro OS. Of "real" data, there's probably about 200MB's worth of files in there. At any rate, even though the file appears as the original 10GB file once the Restore is complete, I cannot access that "V:" drive mapped to the 10GB Thawspace0, as the OS now reports it is corrupted. Running CHKDSK just for fun doesn't help.

When I take an image of the same machine again, but select the "Legacy" checkbox on the PXE screen, then the process seems to pick up that C:\Persis0.dsk file just fine. Currently, I am finishing up taking this 30GB image. Hopefully, the "Legacy" option will have done the trick, but I thought I'd run this past you guys for any opinions...? Thanks!


It's been many years since I've worked with deepfreeze type solutions. I did a quick search and did not really find any official support documentation on the combination (other than some docs describing operation in a ZenWorks 6.5/7 environment).

As the legacy imaging option should be very much comparable to what was happening in the old (7 and down) ZenWorks, it might indeed work. Downside being the imaging being much slower when restoring to devices due to the changes in Windows 7 vs XP.

Some thoughts:

Any idea what exactly is in the C:\Persis0.dsk and if if matters when deploying a base image (e.g. will the file get added and rebuilt during first boot?)?

Depending on if it will be recreated you might also have an option to take an image and then edit the zmg file as to delete the C:\Persis0.dsk file before deploying it to other devices.
If that's not an option, maybe the approach of taking Persis0.dsk out of the zmg and placing a good copy of Persis0.dsk with an add-on image is a way to go? That would at least have an advantage of maintaining imaging speed for the Windows 7 OS portion.

Opening an SR would seem sensible in any case as the imaging engine has been tuned/changed since 11.2 and a change might be needed to accommodate imaging the Persis0.dsk correctly, all in one go.

Would be good to know how you go with this!

Cheers,
Willem
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Re: ZCM 11.2.3a + Tuxera = corrupted DeepFreeze v7 Persis0.d

Thanks for your response, Willem. To answer your questions:

- The C:\Persis0.dsk file 10GB file is the "ThawSpace0" that actually contains the contents of whatever you've saved to that assigned-drive partition. When you create the Thawspace, you specify its size, in my case, 10GB, and that is the permanent size of the file that is created. There is also a metadata file that is simultaneously created on the root of C: that somehow works with the .DSK file, I suppose. Looking at the file sizes after an image Restore is completed, they are the same as the source image... but I KNOW that when imaging using the Tuxera drivers, that the Persis0.DSK isn't being correctly copied, as the process barely hesitates when it hits that 10GB file. Even if some fancy-schmancy compression is being used, what has already been saved to that Thawspace0 amounts to about 210MB of uncompressed files and data, so it MUST take a little while to copy!

-The file does NOT get added and re-built; it is either fully configured and working pre-image, or you've got a mess. Now then, having said that, as you suggest, it MAY be possible that I could get everything configured the way I want, copy the file elsewhere, delete the file, then add it back in as part of a post-image process. In my case, I pre-populate the Thawspace0 partition with programs whose auto-update cannot be easily turned off (and I probably would not want to do so) and that are also fully self-contained, that is, no pieces reside in the fully-frozen C: drive. With Windows, this usually means some sort of Java-based app, and that is exactly what is in that partition: a full copy of "A+" software. HOWEVER- the necessity of even having to do that to make things work gives me the willies when it comes to this OS-level data; if I mess with things too much, it could haunt me later on.

-I would like to open an SR, but I hate to be on the hook for it. May pursue that avenue with our regular Novell consultant, Keith Larson. After today's results, I feel much better about this being a Novell bug, as I just finished an image Restore after uploading the source image using the Legacy driver, and It Works Perfectly. Gosh, imagine that; a bug with the Tuxera driver. Never heard about that one. :^)
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