kuronen
Visitor.
922 views

A little tip for low bandwidth users

I am working with a very bad connection from far side of the world and doing things with Designer is very frustrating and I have to keep deployments to minimum.

So I decided to do more stuff that I can do with iManager. But it is a bit sticky too and I decided to try out something that proved to be wonderful.

I am using openSuse in my laptop and what I did was:
- Installed Apache
- Configured Apache ajp proxy to proxy connections to localhost port 9009 (an iManager front end clone practically)
- Configured Apache mod_cache to remember graphics etc
- Connected via VPN + SSH to the iManager server with options for forwarding localhost port 9009 and compression

The result is blazingly fast iManager! Feels like using it next door.

Only if there was something similar to hasten Designer connections..?
Labels (1)
0 Likes
5 Replies
Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: A little tip for low bandwidth users

kuronen wrote:

> I am using openSuse in my laptop and what I did was:
> - Installed Apache
> - Configured Apache ajp proxy to proxy connections to localhost port
> 9009 (an iManager front end clone practically)
> - Configured Apache mod_cache to remember graphics etc
> - Connected via SSH to the iManager server with options for forwarding
> localhost port 9009 and compression
>
> The result is blazingly fast iManager! Feels like using it next door.


And if you run Windows, CCProxy might be an easy alternative to Apache.

--
http://www.is4it.de/en/solution/identity-access-management/

(If you find this post helpful, please click on the star below.)
0 Likes
Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: A little tip for low bandwidth users

On 18/04/17 04:26, kuronen wrote:

> I am working with a very bad connection from far side of the world and
> doing things with Designer is very frustrating and I have to keep
> deployments to minimum.
>
> So I decided to do more stuff that I can do with iManager. But it is a
> bit sticky too and I decided to try out something that proved to be
> wonderful.
>
> I am using openSuse in my laptop and what I did was:
> - Installed Apache
> - Configured Apache ajp proxy to proxy connections to localhost port
> 9009 (an iManager front end clone practically)
> - Configured Apache mod_cache to remember graphics etc
> - Connected via SSH to the iManager server with options for forwarding
> localhost port 9009 and compression
>
> The result is blazingly fast iManager! Feels like using it next door.
>
> Only if there was something similar to hasten Designer connections..?


Another option might be to install iManager Workstation on to your
openSUSE desktop. This is a self-contained local installation of
iManager that is independent of other versions of iManager installed on
servers (or other clients).

HTH.
--
Simon
Micro Focus Knowledge Partner

------------------------------------------------------------------------
If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
please show your appreciation and click on the star below. Thanks.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
0 Likes
Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: A little tip for low bandwidth users

Simon Flood wrote:

> Another option might be to install iManager Workstation on to your openSUSE
> desktop. This is a self-contained local installation of iManager that is
> independent of other versions of iManager installed on servers (or other
> clients).


Worth a try, but I'm not sure it'll be a performance booster, since you'll then
have NCP communication on the low bandwidth (and probably high latency)
connection, which is the main reason IDM Designer is unusable in such a
scenario.
My best bet is on caching as much of the HTTP traffic as possible. HTTP is
highly optimizable, NCP is not, AFAIK.

--
http://www.is4it.de/en/solution/identity-access-management/

(If you find this post helpful, please click on the star below.)
0 Likes
Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: A little tip for low bandwidth users

Ah, you cached the HTTP side, not the NCP side; that is really
interesting. Great thinking and poking. Now I wonder if you are up for a
bit more of a challenge, and if so, here you go. You seem the
hacking/tinkering type (great compliment intended) so I think you may be
somebody who can help with this.

If iManager, Apache Tomcat really, is not doing a great job with helping
clients (web browsers) cache content, then perhaps that can be tuned.
Looking into this a bit I found the following thread and documentation
that may make this possible from Apache Tomcat directly:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2876250/tomcat-cache-control (see the
response from "Jack")
https://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-8.0-doc/config/filter.html#Expires_Filter

If you took your current setup and changed Apache Tomcat to implement the
ExpiresFilter code that helps not-expire things like images, CSS, JS, etc.
that are probably never changing except when you change a plugin or
iManager as a whole, does it help your performance? If so, it may be
really awesome to make this a standard part of the iManager installer
somehow. It looks like this can be implemented semi-easily in a web.xml
file (part of Tomcat).

If you try this out, please post back results, or let us know if you
cannot try it out for whatever reason. Having a faster iManager is
something we all want, and perhaps focusing on the HTTP side (rather than
the NCP side) is a good way to accomplish that for those of us who are remote.

--
Good luck.

If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
show your appreciation and click on the star below...
0 Likes
kuronen
Visitor.

Re: A little tip for low bandwidth users

The Tomcat installation in this case is from year 2012 so I am not prepared to test it out with this one but I can try it out with a fresh installation later.

It seems that caching between tomcat and apache is working pretty well with a very basic configuration. That is actually the only explanation because it would not be possible to achieve that performance with a connection that is hardly usable with ssh terminal.

I've done some tweaking with Apache headers and another way to change how cache expiration works might be header rewriting. Most likely it would be just a few lines of code, contained in one same nps-apache.conf.
0 Likes
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of Micro Focus. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation. Certain versions of content ("Material") accessible here may contain branding from Hewlett-Packard Company (now HP Inc.) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company. As of September 1, 2017, the Material is now offered by Micro Focus, a separately owned and operated company. Any reference to the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks is historical in nature, and the HP and Hewlett Packard Enterprise/HPE marks are the property of their respective owners.