lelle1 Absent Member.
Absent Member.
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Login Update Disable Interval setting

Hi,

I'm trying to figure out were the setting Login Update Disable Interval get stored?
We are trying to do a scripted install and configuration of e-dir on Linux.
So far I'm unable to find were it is stored, somebody got a clue were to look?

/Lelle
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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: Login Update Disable Interval setting

I'm not sure, but have you checked the _ndsdb.ini file within the DIB
directory?

If not there, I'd check on the NCP server object where you are making this
change, or maybe even the pseudo-server object.

When you find it, please post back your results.


--
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lelle1 Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Login Update Disable Interval setting

Hi,

I have checked the _ndsdb.ini file and its not there, I did look at the server object wit a ldap browser and didn't see the attribute.
When I look at the server and the pseudo server object with iMonitor I see the setting for "LOGIN UPDATE DISABLE SECONDS" under "Permanent Config Parms" and it set by wire. I understand this as it's something set in a interface like iMonitor.

/Lelle
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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: Login Update Disable Interval setting

On 04/02/2019 07:34 AM, lelle wrote:
>
> I have checked the _ndsdb.ini file and its not there, I did look at the
> server object wit a ldap browser and didn't see the attribute.
> When I look at the server and the pseudo server object with iMonitor I
> see the setting for "LOGIN UPDATE DISABLE SECONDS" under "Permanent
> Config Parms" and it set by wire. I understand this as it's something
> set in a interface like iMonitor.


If it is set on the pseudo-server object I am not sure how to have it
automatically be set, other than perhaps by using DIB Clone to create the
new servers, which perhaps you should consider doing anyway if you are
building out a lot of boxes with identical replicas over time.

--
Good luck.

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lelle1 Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Login Update Disable Interval setting

Ok, thanks
I'm not sure if its worth the work

/Lennart
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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Re: Login Update Disable Interval setting

I presume your current process is something like this, after getting the
OS and eDirectory software (the RPMs/binaries/libraries) installed on a
box currently:

Run ndsmanage to create a new instance
Enter tree name
Enter Master IP address
Enter new server name
Enter new server context
Enter admin credentials
Wait a bit for the server to be created
Verify health
Add replicas, one at a time (maybe you only have one for [root]), waiting
for replication to complete each time, until all replicas are added. This
last step is the wildcard; if you have a tiny tree, it's nothing, and if
you have a tree with many partitions, or many objects in partitions, or
slow links, this could take hours.

With DIB Clone you instead do the following:
Use iMonitor to clone the DIB (online mode).
Copy the DIB, NICI, and nds.conf files from the location you specified
(DIB) above, and other respective locations, to the new box (use SCP; it's
quick and secure).
Modify the new nds.conf file for the new box's hostname, possibly eDir
context., and IP addresses (as applicable).
Run ndsconfig upgrade --config-file /etc/opt/novell/eDirectory/conf/nds.conf

How beneficial the process is depends entirely on your environment and
your comfort with simple administration tasks (moving files around,
modifying text files, etc.). The first time with anything is a bit
confusing, but once you understand what is happening it's a pretty awesome
option, particularly if you are doing a bunch of boxes.

Before doing that, maybe it's worth understanding more about why you are
doing this at all. I've done many eDirectory migrations/upgrades in the
past, and sometimes they are done to retire old hardware (physical or
virtual) and the only way people see documented is to either upgrade the
obx in-place (sometimes hard to do, or with too much risk as the upgrade
from one major version to another is not supported by the vendor), or else
add new boxes and decommission old ones. If that is the reason for all of
this, another option is to move the eDirectory instance from the old box
to a new box directly, not using DIB clone (which creates a new server
object), so that the new physical box replaces the old one, and the
eDirectory server is the same all along.

--
Good luck.

If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
show your appreciation and click on the star below.

If you want to send me a private message, please let me know in the
forum as I do not use the web interface often.
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