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Commander
Commander
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performance tuning on windows 2016 se

Hi,

Recently one of our major customers migrated from good old RHEL 6.10 to windows 2016 se as their platform for eDirectory… so far so good, the performance for LDAP operations went down by factor 10 to 12 for the same query, from the same source system, same indexes, same db cache size.

RHEL 6.10
VM
2 CPU, XEON E5-2698 v4, 2.2G
8 GB RAM
eDir 9.0.1
ext3

windows 2016 se
VM
4 CPU, XEON E5-2698 v4, 2.2G (on 2 sockets)
16 GB RAM
eDir 9.2.1
ntfs

...any ideas how / what to optimize on win?

Regards,
N.

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Community Manager Community Manager
Community Manager

Hi @nle

I have a reply from one of our experts here at Micro Focus, @hv1. Hope this helps:

"The performance between Windows and Linux is not that different until moderate load comes into play and even then bumping up the hardware can help even things out.

Performance on Linux will always be somewhat better but not by factors mentioned.  Sounds like there might be a lot of disk swapping, which you can check for. We also need disk speed: 100MB/s I/O at a min.  There are no performance tweaks required on our side. However, there are a number of things that can be done on the OS side (put dib, swap, and RFLs on your own disks (diff controllers), add RAM, set the application's priority in task manager, exclude virus checker, etc.). The main difference between these plats is in the OS's memory management and disk cache use.  Windows is a known memory cow esp. since we do not support headless.  I think you mention 16GB of RAM.  That's way low.

Both my desktop and laptop run Windows. Both have 32GB, don't have replicating databases, and use every ounce of it.  I would not start a loaded Windows server hosting eDir without 64GB and lots of spare fast disk space. You can also monitor it using the built-in performance monitor. Use the sysinternal utilities to get a lower level view: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/

I would concentrate on the memory and disk sections. I regularly use process explorer, vmmap, and disk mon."

 

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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

I'd strongly second the disk speed and virusscan recommendations. Exclude all Edir stuff from virusscan, especially, the DIB folders. Get *separate* SSDs for DIB, RFLs and trace files. If you use drivers with cache files like jdbc, ldap etc, move their cache DBs to another fast and separate disk.

Regarding RAM it's quite easy to monitor if it's enough or not, no rules of thumb required. And yes: Desktops runnign all kind of apps in parallel usually require more RAM than a dedicated server running one main service. Just like Designer needs more RAM than a whole development Edir/IDM VM... 🙂
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https://www.is4it.de/identity-access-management
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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Lothar,

How do you move the state file/cache files for drivers to another disk?

 

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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

Most drivers allow to set the cache directory, iirc. The JDBC shim has a config parameter "state-dir", which defaults to ".", which in turn is the DIB folder. To move it, stop the driver, change the config parameter, move existing state files (you surely have an article published describing how to identify them, right?) to the new location, start driver, done.
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https://www.is4it.de/identity-access-management
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Knowledge Partner Knowledge Partner
Knowledge Partner

You would think I would have such an article... Alas, my collection is incomplete.

 

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