Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

I'm having a very hard time finding this out for sure. There seems to be
some conflicting information in Novell's own documentation.

The basic question is, can you safely disable SRS on all brokers on the
network if you are not using any Public Access printers? Are there any
other impacts at all of disabling SRS besides not being able to use Public
Access printers? (And I mean disabling SRS ENTIRELY, not having SRS
running on ANY broker on the entire network.)

It's a long story but we currently still use queue based printing. We
want to move to NDPS but our network people are concerned that the SRS
service creates a lot of network traffic. Most of what I read on Novell's
site implies that SRS is only used for Public Access printers. We won't
have any of those. But there is some documentation that implies that SRS
is used for more than just Public Access printers, but isn't clear exactly
what else it might be used for or what other functionality you'll lose if
you don't run it.

On a side note, we plan to use raw NDPS, NOT iPrint. We have no use for
the iPrint capabilities in our environment, and we want to leverage the
built-in ability of raw NDPS to automatically deploy printers to
designated workstations on login. (The only way I could find to
automatically deploy iPrint printers is through ZenWorks, which is not an
option for us.)

Thank you.

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11 Replies
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
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Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

I'll ask


Suzanne Miles
Volunteer Sysop, Novell Support Connection
http://support.novell.com/forums/
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

My Novell contact says there is a 85 to 90 % certainty that you should be fine.
Do you want me to investigate further?



Suzanne Miles
Volunteer Sysop, Novell Support Connection
http://support.novell.com/forums/
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

> My Novell contact says there is a 85 to 90 % certainty that you should
be fine.
> Do you want me to investigate further?
>
>


I would greatly appreciate it. I'm about 85% confident myself based on
what I've seen in documentation, but as I mentioned in my original post,
there seems to be a bit of conflicting info in some different documents
I've read. Our network people won't let us run with SRS, so our option is
to verify that SRS isn't required, or we don't use NDPS/iPrint at all.
I'd rather know that for sure before we start into a production
deployment. I can do some testing in a lab environment, but I really
don't want to get in a production environment and run into something that
wasn't foreseen but might have been known about on Novell's side.

Thank you!
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

someone else told me:


The SRS service doesn't create any traffic at all on it's own, so his
concerns aren't valid. All it does is register the broker(s) and PA
printers with SLP. If he doesn't have any PA printers, no additional
load gets created.
And yes, disabling it will cause problems. His management tools will no
longer find the Broker, or claim it's down, totally refusing to admin
it.




Suzanne Miles
Volunteer Sysop, Novell Support Connection
http://support.novell.com/forums/
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

The IPrint Engineering Manager says:

>if there are no public access printers in an iPrint environment, will anything

bad happen if SRS is disabled?

His response - "No. We encourage customers to disable it very often."




Suzanne Miles
Volunteer Sysop, Novell Support Connection
http://support.novell.com/forums/
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

> someone else told me:
>
>
> The SRS service doesn't create any traffic at all on it's own, so his
> concerns aren't valid. All it does is register the broker(s) and PA
> printers with SLP. If he doesn't have any PA printers, no additional
> load gets created.
> And yes, disabling it will cause problems. His management tools will no
> longer find the Broker, or claim it's down, totally refusing to admin
> it.


I very much appreciate you looking into it further, but I see two
answers. Which is it? (I see the above answer but then there is another
that you said was from the iPrint Engineering Manager that says we should
be fine disabling SRS. I guess I'm inclined to believe the one that's
from the iPrint Engineering Manager?)

Also, the bit in the answer I quoted above about the SRS service not
creating traffic on it's own is just plain false according to everything
else I've read, and our own results with network sniffer traces. In some
TID article I read on Novell's web site, there's something about all SRS
agents on the network synchronizing with each other every 20 seconds, and
there's no way to change that except to completely disable SRS.

Don't know about the not being able to manage the broker without SRS
though. I haven't seen anything specific to that one way or the other in
any Novell documentation (which is one reason I'm so confused).
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

It's still under discussion in the back room. <g> There are two schools of
thought.

I'm being told you should have SRS running on ONE broker, but not on every
broker. This will cut down traffic.

I'll watch and summarize the results for you.




Suzanne Miles
Volunteer Sysop, Novell Support Connection
http://support.novell.com/forums/
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

> It's still under discussion in the back room. <g> There are two
schools of
> thought.
>
> I'm being told you should have SRS running on ONE broker, but not on

every
> broker. This will cut down traffic.
>
> I'll watch and summarize the results for you.
>


Thanks for the update. In our case, we don't want to run SRS on any
brokers at all. Also, on another note, we're dealing with remote offices
connected to the main office by 256k frame relay lines. There is a server
in each remote office, but we don't want the SRS traffic going across the
WAN (or running around our central network in the main office). All
servers are part of the same tree but each remote office has it's own
replica partition.
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

> It's still under discussion in the back room. <g> There are two
schools of
> thought.
>
> I'm being told you should have SRS running on ONE broker, but not on

every
> broker. This will cut down traffic.
>
> I'll watch and summarize the results for you.
>
>


Any further update yet?

Thanks!
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

This is the latest....

========
The aspect that first comes to mind are the occasions on which
the NDPSM may need to find an alternate ENS/RMS not hosted on the same
box as the NDPSM. Currently the NDPSM uses SRS to find another
available broker service, and would fail to do so in an SRS-less
environment. Not necessarily a show-stopper reason, but something
besides "public access PAs" you would technically be giving up.

you DO get a lot of traffic from enabling the SRS. The SRS synchronizes
services with every other SRS it can get its hands on, and periodically
heartbeats them & synchronizes any changes it learns about. And that is
probably the reason iPrint says they encourage many folks to turn it off.

Not installing/enabling an SRS on a LAN such as Novell's corporate
backbone wouldn't be much of a test, FWIW. You have 120+ other SRS
services running in your environment; the fact that your specific
server isn't running one won't mean you don't have one & aren't using
one.
==========

One sysop says:

I only have one broker in my LAN, and as soon as I disable SRS on it,
all admin tools refuse to administrate the broker, either claiming there
is none, or claiming it's down. Of course, technically you might get
away with that too, as long as you don't need to admin it. And BTW, the
warning message the broker gives when you try to disable the last SRS
service in the clearly states that this will happen.



Suzanne Miles
Volunteer Sysop, Novell Support Connection
http://support.novell.com/forums/
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Anonymous_User Absent Member.
Absent Member.

Re: Is SRS required with no Public Access printers?

> This is the latest....
>
> ========


Thanks for the update and for your effort to look into this. Except for
the potential admin issue, I'm not very concerned. Each server is
essentially a standalone server, though all servers are part of the same
NDS tree. That's because each server is in a remote site connected by
frame relay so to reduce WAN traffic we run all services for a given
location on the server in that location. Hence, for any given physical
printer in that location, it's printer agent, NDPS manager, and NDPS
broker will all be running on the server in that same physical office.

In regards to the admin issue, we have done some testing in an isolated
environment where we didn't have SRS running on any servers (in fact we
only had 1 single server running in that test environment) and we were
still able to admin the broker. We'll have to play with this some more I
suppose.

If you do find anything more, please do let me know, but I think I'm
pretty confident that we can turn off SRS in our case.
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